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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: Better Communities, Better Lives”, released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in June 2021


“Salmon brought me a strong sense of community, something I had never really felt before. That came as an unexpected surprise. I felt protective of what we share, and that the next generation deserves it as much as we do. I got political and ran for city council. I talked to everyone who would speak with me and found out that a lot of people shared those values. It was rare to come across someone who didn’t care about the parks and trails and nature we are so fortunate to have right outside our door,” stated Laura Dupont.

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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: Operationalizing the BC Landscape Water Calculator”, released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in June 2021


“In 2011, the City looked at options to reduce peak water demands due to the high cost of a new water source. This included conservation, optimizing existing sources and system efficiencies. Several different conservation programs were explored, one of the programs implemented was a voluntary program for irrigation and landscape water efficiency. The solution to our need was the BC Landscape Water Calculator. Homeowners can now provide us with a report that shows how their choice of water efficient plants and landscape design meets their water budget,” stated Amy Peters.

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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: Accounting for Stream Systems in Asset Management”, released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in June 2021


“The EAP methodology reflects the understanding that landowners adjacent to the stream corridor and setback zone (30 metres on both sides of the stream) and the broader community share responsibility for and benefit from the condition of the stream as well as the financial and ecological value of the land it occupies. The study’s intent was to pilot the EAP in the context of the Millstone River, an important ecological feature in the Nanaimo region, to test the methodology and take away learnings for further refinement in future applications,” stated Julie Pisani.

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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: Columbia Basin Water Hub”, released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in June 2021


“In response to a 2017 Columbia Basin Trust report that pointed to the need for a coordinated monitoring effort and central data repository in the Upper Columbia Basin, Living Lakes Canada organized a conference in late 2017 that was attended by water data experts from across North America who discussed the democratization of data, the merits of open source, and the need for a water monitoring framework for the region,” stated Nicole Trigg. Launched in March 2021, the Columbia Basin Water Hub will make critical water data readily available to decision makers.

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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: Balance is Key to Good Government”, released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in June 2021


“At the end of the day, good decision-making comes down to a good process. But it also relies on wisdom in terms of balanced advice. And it comes with an accountable, political group of elected representatives that make the decisions. Balance is key to good government. One needs good administrative expertise to advise and serve the political arm. At the same time, the political arm has to trust the administrative arm. The two arms must work together. Council buy-in follows when Council fundamentally respects the work that Staff does,” stated Peter Steblin.

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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: Power of Collaborative Leadership” – released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in June 2021


“The Partnership is a legal entity, yet operationally it functions as a network rather than as an organization in any conventional sense. The work of The Partnership is guided by a network way-of-thinking that reflects our genesis as a water-centric technical committee in the 1990s. We recognize that to be successful in facilitating changes in practice over the long-term, the groundwork has to be done by our partners. This means that the work of The Partnership must be aligned with and support their organizational objectives,” stated Mike Tanner.

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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: Dockside Green, the World’s Greenest Neighbourhood,” released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in May 2021


“Humans have tried to control the uncontrollable, master the unmasterable, and conquer the unconquerable. We have failed. Do we have the intelligence and will to impel change? Dockside Green is an example of a project that did just that with three key aspects that busted convention wide open. Dockside Green is a 15-acre Brownfield site redevelopment located adjacent to downtown Victoria, BC. It was redeveloped to achieve the highest sustainability rating in the world under the LEEDTM green building rating system in 2008 and again in 2009,” stated Kim Fowler.

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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: Asset Management for Sustainable Service Delivery”, released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in May 2021


“Everyone in a local government organization needs to recognize that asset management is a process, not a plan. The approach BC local governments follow for their asset management process is enshrined in the document Asset Management for Sustainable Service Delivery: A BC Framework. The important and telling part of the title is Asset Management is a process to provide a sound basis for decisions relating to the function – which is service delivery,” stated Wally Wells.

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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: Creating Safe Cities for Salmon”, released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in May 2021


“Protection of salmon and their habitat from the adverse impacts of urban development is a challenging task that requires an all-of-government response. Findings from this research highlight the variable involvement and guidance provided from the higher levels of government in Canada. As one expert noted, the province must provide more clarity on direct regulatory obligations which have compliance initiatives in place to enforce them. Inadequate statutory foundations and enforcement of current regulations have only hindered the implementation of nature-based solutions to protect salmon in cities,” stated Andrea McDonald.

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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: Short-Term Gratification versus Long-Term Legacy” – released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in May 2021


“In British Columbia at least, we know what we need to do to adapt to a changing water cycle. Whether and how we deal with uncertainty, manage risk, and adapt to droughts and floods will depend on how effective we are in encouraging a spirit of inter-generational collaboration among decision-makers at all levels within government and with community. The goal would be to build bridges of understanding and pass the baton from the past to the present and future,” stated Kim Stephens.

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