FLASHBACK TO 2011: Framework for a “Regional Team Approach to Water Sustainability in the Thompson Rivers Region” explored at a concept development session organized by the Partnership for Water Sustainability, and held in Kamloops

"The Concept Development Session in September 2011 served as an inaugural meeting of individuals with a role in water and land management. The session purpose was to determine the viability of a regional team approach to water sustainability within the region ," explained Ron Smith. "The apparent disconnect between water and land management was noted by many participants."

FLASHBACK TO 2011: Okanagan Basin Water Board released ‘Managing Stormwater in a Changing Climate’ – a report on the From Rain to Resource 2010 workshop


"We spent the last half a century trying to control runoff with dikes, storm sewers, curbs and gutters. Now, increased development and increased storm intensity from climate change are increasing peak flows and altering the rules of the game," stated Anna Warwick Sears. “The Okanagan is particularly vulnerable to the impacts of unmanaged stormwater and rainwater."

TURNING IDEAS INTO ACTION: Sustainable Watershed Systems – a decade long journey has its genesis in the seminar that launched the Beyond the Guidebook Initiative (November 2007)

“The Stormwater Guidebook set in motion a chain of outcomes that has resulted in BC being recognized internationally as a leader in implementing a natural systems approach to rainwater management in the urban environment,” stated Minister of Environment Barry Penner in 2007. “The Convening for Action initiative creates an opportunity to move beyond rainwater management to embrace all components of the water cycle through integrated water management.”

WHAT HAPPENS ON THE LAND DOES MATTER! – “Stormwater Impacts Communities and Creeks – What Can Streamkeepers Do?” – theme for regional workshop hosted by North Shore Streamkeepers (March 2017)

“My motivation is simple – I live right by a stream. I hear it roar when the rain is heavy, I hear it trickle in the summer. It provides comfort on dreary days. To me it is nature’s music. It is always there, that is how it should be. A threat to that undermines all those emotions that I and many streamkeepers feel," stated Jane Dysart. “Cause and effect. We hope to learn where we can help local government, and possibly participate by bringing ideas based on knowledge from this workshop.”

WHAT HAPPENS ON THE LAND DOES MATTER! – “Communities do have choices. Will they get it right the second time?” asked Kim Stephens at a workshop organized by the North Shore Streamkeepers (March 2017)

The 2nd annual North Vancouver workshop organized attracted participants from communities throughout the Metro Vancouver region, and on a Saturday afternoon! “The scope of involvement and influence of the streamkeeper is expanding beyond the creek channel,” stated Kim Stephens. “There is something taking place in British Columbia right now. It is a re-kindling of what took place in the 1990s and early 2000s in terms of the stewardship sector."

WHAT HAPPENS ON THE LAND DOES MATTER! – hosted by Forester University (May 2017), the Water Balance Webinar from British Columbia introduced a North American audience to the methodology that underpins vision for “Sustainable Watershed Systems, through Asset Management”

"We were delighted to have Kim Stephens and Jim Dumont share British Columbia’s cutting-edge continuous simulation model, known as the Water Balance Methodology, via a Forester University webcast,” stated Emily Shine. "At Forester University, we aim to position ourselves at the forefront of innovation in rainwater management and green infrastructure, and that is why we described Water Balance Methodology as a webinar that could not be missed."

WHAT HAPPENS ON THE LAND DOES MATTER! – “Slow, sink and spread rainwater runoff to mimic the water balance,” stated UBC’s Julie Wilson at a workshop organized by the North Shore Streamkeepers (March 2017)

“My goal is for us to think about how water moves through the landscape, as it falls as precipitation and is altered by the urban environment, and then understand how can we can go about mimicking the natural water balance,” stated Julie Wilson. “I have used the Water Balance Express for a few years in the courses that I teach. The reception that I get is overwhelmingly positive. Students really love using the Water Balance Express because it is fun and user friendly.”

FLASHBACK TO 2007 PUBLICATION: The Green Infrastructure Guide – Issues, Implementation Strategies and Success Stories

"Two complementary strategies can 'green' a community and its infrastructure: first, preserving as much as possible of the natural green infrastructure; and secondly, promoting designs that soften the footprint of development," wrote Susan Rutherford. "Green infrastructure design is engineering design that takes a ‘design with nature’ approach, to both mitigate the potential impacts of existing and future development and growth and to provide valuable services."

FLASHBACK TO 2005: “Implementing change is primarily a people matter, not a technical one,” wrote Erik Karlsen in a paper that introduced the What / So What / Now What / Then What mind-map as a foundation piece for convening for action

“Bridging the gap between interest and practice involves motivating practitioners to engage in ways that provide sufficient meaning to inspire them and lead to action. The desired outcome is implementation of on-the-ground changes in policies, programs, applied research, practitioner education and standards of practice that lead to full integration of land development and water management," stated Erik Karlsen.

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: How the Water Sustainability Act is Already Influencing Water Management in British Columbia (Landscape Architects Annual Conference – Shifting Currents, April 2016)

The keynote address was a co-presentation by Kim Stephens and Ted van der Gulik of the Partnership for Water Sustainability in BC. “Licensing 20,000 wells initially seemed daunting when a provincial group met in mid-2015 to brainstorm an approach to this immense task. The team had to solve the challenge of HOW to help groundwater users reliably quantify their annual water licence volumes. Suffice to say, the brainstorming resulted in an Aha Moment and a solution took shape," stated Ted van der Gulik.