Archive:

2019

PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM SPONSOR: MacDonald-Gray Consultants – “designing with nature” means work with a site rather than against it!


“We are pleased to lend our support to the education and advancement of watershed stewardship on Vancouver Island through the efforts of local and provincial partners for the symposium in Parksville,” stated Nigel Gray, Principal Planner. “Environmental stewardship and natural systems based land development are key components to our approach to our land use planning and landscape architecture service areas. It is our hope that the Parksville 2019 Symposium will affect the further evolution of local policy development and regulatory frameworks in the mid-island region.”

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RAINWATER MANAGEMENT IN THE COMOX VALLEY: “Our local governments have commonly relied on hard engineering solutions that employ expensive infrastructure. That approach has left us with a long-term financial burden we cannot afford,” wrote George Le Masurier in an article explaining why there is now a shift toward green infrastructure on Vancouver Island


“Stormwater management plans in the Comox Valley have historically treated rainwater as waste, something to be collected and disposed of quickly, usually into previously clean streams or directly into the ocean. Clearly a new approach is needed,” wrote George Le Masurier. “Forward-thinking municipalities have shifted toward source control, managing rain where it falls through infiltration, evapotranspiration and rainwater harvesting, techniques known as green infrastructure.”

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RAINWATER MANAGEMENT IN THE COMOX VALLEY: “We’re learning how to integrate green infrastructure and low-impact development going forward,” stated Ryan O’Grady, City of Courtenay Director of Engineering, when commenting on the vision and desired outcome for the City’s Integrated Rainwater Management Plan


“The plan for integrated rainwater management will encompass strategies for flood mitigation in the downtown core, how to replace traditional engineered infrastructure with green solutions and will look through a broad lens at regional solutions,” explained Ryan O’Grady. “There’s a collective desire to collaborate … it would be great to work together. I look forward to facilitating that conversation with the bigger group (that also includes the neighbouring local governments, development community, stewardship groups, and K’omoks First Nation).”

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FLASHBACK TO 2015: “A Guide to Water-Wise Land Development in the Comox Valley” – Joint Staff Training Workshop initiated educational process for communicating ‘design with nature’ expectations in urban watersheds


“The Water-Wise Guide can be viewed as a communication tool,” stated Nancy Gothard, City of Courtenay environmental planner. “But more than that, it is both a call to action (for the community, but also for us) as well as a road map for that action. So, our goal is to begin to brand the story and depict visually that we are developing a consistency in expectations as to how development would address environmental concerns. Having the Water-Wise Guide available on every front counter and every website is a first step.”

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IMPROVING WHERE WE LIVE THROUGH RESTORATIVE DEVELOPMENT: Whole-System, Water Balance Approach / Learn more at Parksville 2019 / April 2-3-4 (Announcement #4, January 2019)


“Retrofiting at multiple scales and multiple levels is really key. But, so many people in local government are just too busy these days to even contemplate what needs to be done to repair and restore at multiple scales and levels. As a result, and especially in the big urban cities, it is just too difficult for local government staff to work concurrently at multiple scales,” stated Dr. Chris May. “Kitsap is at a manageable scale. The County is big enough to effect change and make things better. That is our goal – have a positive impact on the community!”

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MAKE WHERE WE LIVE BETTER: Local government initiatives on Vancouver Island are “getting it right” / Learn more at Parksville 2019 / April 2-3-4 (Announcement #3, January 2019)


“Financial support from the Real Estate Foundation will substantially subsidize the registration for the stewardship sector. Many community volunteers are on fixed or modest incomes. So, reducing the cost for them to attend a 2-day symposium has been a governing consideration for the Parksville 2019 Organizing Committee. The Parksville 2019 program has relevance and applicability to settled areas throughout BC,” stated Ted van der Gulik, President of the Partnership for Water Sustainability in BC.

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AT PARKSVILLE 2019: Cross-border collaboration connects us with a larger body of experience! – Learn from Dave Derrick, stream restoration innovator, at a workshop on Sustainable Stream Restoration (on April 2) SPACE LIMITED


“Through 150-plus workshops in the last 8 years I have taught over 8,000 individuals the philosophy, methods, and concepts of river design and fluvial geomorphology. Over the course of my career as a research hydraulic engineer with the US Army Corps of Engineers, I have been an educator, facilitator, designer, reviewer, and constructor of almost every type of river and stream stabilization/restoration project imaginable,” stated Dave Derrick.

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AT PARKSVILLE 2019: On April 3, the theme for Day One of the Symposium on Water Stewardship in a Changing Climate is SUSTAINABLE STREAM RESTORATION >>> “Reconnect hydrology and ecology – because what happens on the land in the creekshed matters to streams!” (REGISTRATION NOW OPEN)


In the 1990s, Dr. Chris May’s seminal research defined the relationship between land use change and stream impacts. To protect and/or or restore stream ecology, and thereby achieve the goal of Sustainable Stream Restoration, communities must address the root causes of ‘changes in hydrology’ (water quantity). Chris May is both an environmental scientist and an engineer. He will open Parksville 2019 with a presentation titled The Science Behind the Whole-System, Water Balance Approach.

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AT PARKSVILLE 2019: On April 4, the theme for Day Two of the Symposium on Water Stewardship in a Changing Climate is RESTORATIVE LAND DEVELOPMENT >>> “Yes, we can decrease our destructive footprint while at the same time increasing our restorative footprint!” (REGISTRATION NOW OPEN)


In his first book, titled The Restoration Economy (2002), Storm Cunningham included a working definition of restorative development as follows: “the process of adding new value to natural or built assets, ideally in a manner that detracts neither from their other preexisting values, nor from the value of other assets”. His books are meant to launch a new dialogue about the “whole” created by the myriad activities that are already restoring our built and natural environments worldwide.

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PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM: Make Where We Live Better through Restorative Development – How will communities ‘get it right’ through collaboration as land develops and redevelops? (April 2-3-4, 2019) (Registration Open)


The Parksville 2019 Symposium is a milestone event on a multi-year ‘convening for action’ journey. A decade of effort on Vancouver Island, by partnerships of local governments and community stewards, is demonstrating success on the ground where it matters. They are on a pathway to reconnect hydrology and ecology. Parksville 2019 will celebrate success stories that are characterized by three attributes: commitment, collaboration and the ‘hard work of hope’. “Vancouver Island success stories are beacons of hope. They demonstrate how a good strategy is the path to success,” stated Kim Stephens.

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