Category:

articles for period 2011 thru 2015

FLASHBACK: British Columbia’s “Dealing with Drought Handbook” was released at the 2004 Penticton Drought Forum


“The hot, dry summers of recent years, and 2003 in particular, brought home the message that we shouldn’t take our water supply for granted. We need to change our way of thinking about our valuable water resource to ensure we are protecting water for communities, for economic development and for the sustainability of fish and aquatic ecosystems,” stated Environment Minister Barry Penner.

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FLASHBACK: Vision for waterbucket.ca website presented at “Penticton Drought Forum” in July 2004


“Integrated water management involves consideration of land, water, air and living organisms – including humans – as well as the interactions among them. Through partnerships, the Water Sustainability Action Plan is promoting the watershed as a fundamental planning unit,” stated Mike Tanner. “The vision for the waterbucket.ca website is to provide a resource rich, highly interactive ‘destination location’ website.”

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Okanagan Basin Waterscape: Water – the myth of abundance


“We live in a dry landscape. The large lakes make water look abundant, but nature’s yearly resupply is small. As our population is growing rapidly, so is our demand for water. Climate is changing and future water supplies are uncertain. Will there be enough water for our children and grandchildren? To meet the needs of humans and nature, we will have to rethink our water use, and value it more highly,” stated Ted van der Gulik.

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2015 Drought: Metro Vancouver Region in Uncharted Territory!


The ‘new normal’ in British Columbia is drought and flooding. The summer dry season has extended on both ends and communities can no longer count on a predictable snowpack and reliable rain to maintain a healthy water balance in their watersheds. “We are in uncharted territory, we’ve never had it this dry ever in recorded history,” said North Vancouver Mayor Darrell Mussatto.

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Impact of a Changing Climate: 2015 Drought Triggers Stage 2 Water Restrictions in Metro Vancouver


In order to conserve water during the unseasonably dry and hot weather, Metro Vancouver introduced new water restrictions that include regulations around lawn watering. Declaring that the Metro Vancouver region is in the second stage of a four-stage plan, the Commissioner of the Water District (Carol Mason) said “we are asking residents and businesses to further conserve water at this time.”

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FLASHBACK TO 2009: “Hot, dry June could mean water shortages,” reported the Vancouver Sun


An unusually hot, dry start to the summer combined with rapid snowmelt means Metro Vancouver could be facing water shortages later in the year. “Unless the weather turns very wet very soon, the summer of 2009 appears destined to experience very low river, lake and reservoir levels through the south interior, with the myriad of water-supply and ecosystem challenges that result,” stated Allan Chapman.

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“Fin Donnelly, Ted van der Gulik and Jordan Point – this may be one of the heaviest-hitting panels I’ve ever participated on,” states Anna Warwick Sears, Executive Director, Okanagan Basin Water Board


“We are the only panel that will be talking about watersheds. We will be as frank and forthcoming as possible about the challenges and opportunities. Each member of the panel will speak to Water/Land Use interactions in BC, and along the Fraser River in particular. Each will elaborate on the biggest concerns for the future, anticipated positive changes, what civil society can do to ensure a better future, and where we are going from here,” stated Anna Warwick Sears.

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FLASHBACK TO 2005: Australia’s Peter Coombes reflects on his part in the Across Canada Rainwater Harvesting Workshop Series and the parallel journey Down Under to a resilient future


“The easy going ‘she’ll be right mate’ culture of Australians masks strong aversion to change ‘we’ve always done it this way’. Our water management is, mostly, a centralised top down (driven by institutions) process. In contrast, Canadians have a bottom up (driven by people) discussion ‘let’s talk about this’ about ideas – consensus via non-government organisations and community governance,” wrote Peter Coombes.

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