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Tim Pringle

    The Partnership for Water Sustainability vision is to nest EAP, the Ecological Accounting Process, within a university program for training the next generation of land use professionals


    “Our collaboration with regional partners is guided by a vision that working together we can increase the environmental, social, cultural, and economic sustainability of the biosphere region. VIU students have assisted with working on all the Ecological Accounting Process case study projects that have been completed in partnership with MABRRI. Both undergraduates and graduates have assisted with these projects,” stated Graham Sakaki.

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    DID YOU KNOW: The function and responsibility of Municipal Councils and Regional Boards is “Sustainable Service Delivery”


    “The core document for asset management for BC local governments is ‘Asset Management for Sustainable Service Delivery: A BC Framework’. The title of the Framework is deliberate and important. The Framework provides the basis for the entire asset management process for our local governments to follow. Funding agencies, as part of funding applications, request communities to identify where they are within the asset management process using the framework. While much attention and discussion focus on the Asset Management plan or plans, there is much more to the process than just the plan,” stated Glen Brown.

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    ECOLOGICAL ACCOUNTING: Do you wonder how streams influence neighbourhoods and property values? To find out, download the latest report by the Partnership!


    EAP, the Ecological Accounting Process, addresses this question: How do communities decide how much to invest in the natural commons? The EAP methodology and metrics enable a local government to determine the WORTH of the natural commons, with ‘worth’ being the foundation for an annual budget for maintenance and maintenance of ecological assets. Application of the EAP methodology can help to inform an investment strategy for protection and/or restoration of ecological-hydrological function,” stated Tim Pringle.

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    VALUATION OF ECOLOGICAL SERVICES: Do you wonder how streams influence property values and purchasers? To find out, download the Shelly Creek report!


    “We arrived at an important insight about ecological assets; that is, an ecological commons is a land use. Regulations define stream functions and setback requirements. Whether it is a pond, wetland or riparian zone, it can be measured. The assessed values of adjacent parcels can be used to provide a value for the natural commons. The inference is that the area of the natural commons would be zoned residential or whatever if the stream was not there,” stated Tim Pringle.

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    Natural Assets as Ecological Systems and Services – IF YOU WONDER WHY, THEN CONTINUE READING (#3 in a series)


    “The idea of a natural commons supporting a package of ecological services which the community wants and expects to have implies that approved plans for land development should not result in ecological services being merely residual outcomes. Should the community simply be happy with what is left?” stated Tim Pringle. “Rather, their maintenance and management (M&M) should be planned as core municipal services.”

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    NEW GUIDANCE DOCUMENT: Primer on Integrating Natural Assets into Asset Management (BC Framework Series)


    “Asset management is a process for sustainable service delivery. The BC Framework is designed as a wheel as there is a beginning but no end to the process. The role of natural assets in our communities is not well understood. As the Primer shows, significant work has been done on the integration of natural assets into the overall asset management program,” states Wally Wells. The Primer builds on the foundations established by EAP, the Ecological Accounting Process, and the Municipal Natural Assets Initiative.

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    Town of Comox experience demonstrates that “Ecological Services are Core Municipal Services, not an Add-On”


    “As we proceed with next steps, the most challenging will be educating staff, developers, consultants, and home owners of the new standards, procedures, policies and guidelines,” continues Shelley Ashfield. “Changing engineering standards is a journey in itself. To ensure success, the Town will need to adopt the design standards, update existing subdivision servicing specifications, establish a number of bylaws, and implement a cost recovery program.”

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