Category:

Protecting Quality and Ecology

Governments of Canada and British Columbia announce ‘B.C. Salmon Restoration and Innovation Fund’: “Wild salmon are deeply woven into B.C.’s cultural, social and economic fabric,” stated Premier John Horgan (March 2016)


“When it comes to our wild salmon stocks, there is no better indicator of the challenges we face than rising water temperatures, low snow pack, rivers that aren’t full with enough water to sustain our salmon, and that’s where we need to intervene,” said Premier John Horgan. “The salmon don’t know boundaries. The orca don’t know boundaries. They don’t know jurisdictions, one order of government over another. All they know is that humans have been interfering in their life cycles and it’s time for humans to get in the game and make a better choice and better decisions and help the salmon survive.”

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IMPROVING WHERE WE LIVE: “Engagement of community through stewardship is a credible formula to be encouraged and mainstreamed at every opportunity,” states Eric Bonham – as a Director in the B.C. Ministry of Environment in the 1990s, Eric oversaw the highly successful Urban Salmon Habitat Program


“Stewardship operates under a different dynamic than the private sector or government. Stewards are drawn together for a common cause, like-minded individuals with a vision for the greater good,” states Eric Bonham. “This purpose is not to be found in the policy manuals of government, nor in regulations or legislation. Rather, it is built upon an enthusiastic personal commitment and passion by a band of individuals to make a difference. Financial gain is not a factor, nor is fame, and hard work is not grudged.”

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WATERSHED HEALTH AND YOU: At the Parksville 2019 Symposium, Gilles Wendling elaborates on “Groundwater & Surface Water Interaction in the Englishman River Watershed: One Water – Always Moving”


Because he looked at groundwater differently in the Englishman River, Dr. Gilles Wendling has advanced the science and he has developed a practical application of water balance thinking. His contributions to science-based understanding extend beyond the technical and into the communication and education realm. His work provides a bridge between rainfall and stream health.

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ENGLISHMAN RIVER WATER SERVICE: At the Parksville 2019 Symposium, Vaughan Figueira elaborates on “A Balancing Act – Regional Bulk Water Supply Needs & Environmental Flow Requirements to Sustain Aquatic Resources”


“The location of a new water intake site is a major piece of the water supply puzzle. The location is of interest to many in our community and First Nations have a traditional link to the river,” states Vaughan Figueira. “Using a sustainable approach weighing environmental, financial and social factors and in consultation with Department of Fisheries and Oceans, health authorities, provincial fisheries and regulators, the best location for a river intake is just above Highway 19.”

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CITIZEN SCIENCE IN ACTION, PROTECTING BC HABITAT: “The search was on for ways to make a bigger impact. This led to North Shore Streamkeepers asking DFO for ‘high value targets’ for enhancement. Mosquito Creek was identified as one of the best opportunities on the North Shore,” wrote Barbara Frisken and Glen Parker


Stewardship operates under a different dynamic than the private sector or government. Stewards are drawn together for a common cause, like-minded individuals with a vision for the greater good. “As members of North Shore Streamkeepers (NSSK), we are proud to be part of a province-wide network of stewardship groups and pleased to have the opportunity to share some of our stories,” stated Barbara Frisken.

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CITIZEN SCIENCE IN ACTION, PROTECTING BC HABITAT: “Collaboration taps into the passion and ingenuity of volunteers who are driven by commitment,” wrote Eric Bonham in an opinion piece (published in the Vancouver Province, February 2019)


“Throughout British Columbia, an amazing network of volunteer groups is working to protect, restore and enhance local streams,” states Eric Bonham. “Teamwork for the common good is a powerful and often transformative experience, particularly when a longer term vision for a local creekshed engages multiple interests, disciplines and local government. Today, the scope of involvement and influence of stream stewards is expanding beyond the creek channel. What happens on the land matters to streams.”

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KUS-KUS-SUM RESTORATION ON THE COURTENAY RIVER ON VANCOUVER ISLAND: “Restoration will have tremendous cultural, environmental, social, and economic benefits, and the community has shown a high level of enthusiasm over the future vision for this site,” stated David Allen, CAO, City of Courtenay


A historic milestone in reconciliation and intergovernmental relations has taken place in the Comox Valley. A First Nation, a municipality and an environmental non-profit signed a MOU to purchase, restore and manage a key property in the heart of their community. “Working collaboratively with Project Watershed and K’ómoks First Nation has been an essential component of this project. As we move forward through the formal agreement process we look forward to building on this strong relationship with our partners,” stated David Allen.

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OPINION PIECE: “We are at a moment of truth. Local governments are implementers. This means they can be change leaders. We can make where we live better,” wrote Tim Pringle, Chair, Ecological Accounting Process (EAP) Initiative (Vancouver Sun, September 2018)


“They can integrate climate adaptation into the activities and actions of engineered and natural asset management – or flipping it around, integrate asset management into the activities and actions of climate adaptation. Getting it right starts with recognition that hydrology is the engine that powers ecological services. But getting it right depends on provincial and local government alignment to require ‘design with nature’ standards of practice for servicing of land,” wrote Tim Pringle.

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WATCH THE YOUTUBE VIDEO: “Keep working to make your world better. You are engaged with pride, and with joy, in the hard work of hope. And what you are doing offers hope to all,” stated Bob Sandford in his closing synthesis at the Nanaimo Water Stewardship Symposium (April 2018)


“Streamkeepers and municipalities both have a great deal of unexercised power and capacity to collaborate in the interests of the common good. You have only started; and in so doing, you can move outside the limitations of formal, established governance structures,” stated Bob Sandford. “It is the way to move out from under that, to build new governance pathways. And pathways to real power that can allow you to make change possible in a much shorter period of time. You have proven that, if you change your attitudes, changes in practice follow almost immediately. So, I ask and urge you to carry on.”

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Kus-kus-sum Restoration of a Decommissioned Sawmill Site on the Courtenay River: A community prepares to unpave a parking lot and put up a paradise


“The long-term vision for transforming a sawmill site into a valuable habitat corridor could also transform the city’s most troublesome flood liabilities into an eco-asset corridor for the whole community,” wrote Vanessa Scott. “The Comox Valley is approaching a watershed moment in land restoration, and all of British Columbia can learn some important lessons here. Led by wild salmon and local passion, Kus-kus-sum highlights how public engagement and storytelling is a key driver underlying restoration.”

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