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Vancouver Island

    Parksville 2019 on YouTube > RECONOMICS Process for Community Revitalization and Watershed Restoration – “I have yet to find a community or region that had the complete 6-step process, and a process that is not complete is not a process at all,” stated Storm Cunningham (April 2019)


    “You have heard about the Ecological Footprint and the Carbon Footprint. These measure the damage done as a result of our existence. They are wonderful tools. But we also need to measure the good stuff that we are doing. This is the Restorative Footprint, so that we are moving forward on two feet, not just hopping along on one negative foot,” stated Storm Cunningham. “The only way we can have a continuously growing economy is to base that economic growth on revitalizing the places where we have already developed.”

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    IMPROVING WHERE WE LIVE: “The International Year of the Salmon is not just about fish. It is about us and our ability to adapt to change. It is damn important to inspire a new generation to look at the landscape differently,” stated Nick Leone, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, at the Parksville 2019 Symposium on Water Stewardship in a Changing Climate


    At the Parksville 2019 Symposium, DFO’s Nick Leone drew audience attention to the fact that 2019 is the International Year of the Salmon. This initiative has the potential to be a catalyst for outreach and research that inspires a new generation to ensure the resilience of salmon and people throughout the Northern Hemisphere, he said. “The International Year of the Salmon is not just about the fish. It is about us and our ability to adapt to change and resiliency,” stated Nick Leone. “Bring people together, share and develop knowledge, raise awareness and take action.”

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    “Getting local government engineers to implement green infrastructure that protects or restores water quality in developed areas will take massive and relentless public pressure on local governments,” wrote columnist George Le Masurier after attending the Parksville 2019 Symposium


    “Has engineered stormwater doomed BC’s waterways? As population growth continues unrestrained and subsequent urban development expands the dimension of impervious surfaces, an increasing volume of polluted stormwater runoff will poison British Columbia’s waters, local species and natural ecosystems. It sounds like a doomsday prediction, and according to the keynote speaker at a recent provincial conference on water stewardship it’s going to take a major change in local government thinking to avert this disaster,” wrote George Le Masurier.

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    WATCH THE PARKSVILLE WATER STEWARDSHIP SYMPOSIUM ON YOUTUBE: a set of nine videos provide a record of what was shared when close to 200 delegates convened to celebrate success stories, and learn from those who are “improving where we live through restorative development” (April 2019)


    “The goal of making the world ‘less worse’ does not go far enough. Rather, we have it within our power to undo previous damage and make the world better,” stated Storm Cunningham. “The first step is to create an ongoing revitalization (or resilience) program, which constantly initiates, perpetuates, evaluates and adjusts local renewal efforts. The first job of that program is to facilitate a shared vision for the future. The second step is to create a strategy to implement that vision. Next, it’s best to do some policy work, adding policies to support that strategy, and removing policies that undermine it.”

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    FLASHBACK TO NANAIMO 2018 SYMPOSIUM: “We have created a Star Wars civilization, with Stone Age emotions, medieval institutions and godlike technology,” quoted Bob Sandford during his public lecture titled ‘The Hard Work of Hope – The Answer is in Nature’ (April 2018, watch on YouTube)


    “When those who wish to make the world a better place turn to big data and related breakthroughs in deeper communication in support of common understanding of issue such as water and water-related climate concerns, we find that we have arrived too late,’ stated Bob Sandford. “This space has already hijacked by the inevitable forces of power and greed. The public mind is already being heavily manipulated toward other ends. This is also why there has been a widespread resurgence of carefully orchestrated climate denial.”

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    PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM: “As the online survey showed, this ‘convening for action’ event met or exceeded expectations for 95% of delegates; furthermore, the event was successful because the right players were present, the urgency for meaningful collaboration was recognized, and ‘can do’ success stories were shared,” stated Kim Stephens


    “In embarking on the year-long journey to plan and deliver Parksville 2019, our vision and mission was to demonstrate the power of collaboration between the stewardship sector and local governments, and give folks hope that good things would flow from such collaboration,” stated Kim Stephens. “Hence, our main focus was on showcasing success stories that would be inspirational. At the same time, we had to bring to life the phrase ‘improve where we live through restorative development’. This meant that we had to connect the dots between the two ideas in order to demonstrate that some communities are moving beyond rhetoric.”

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    PARKSVILLE 2019 PROGRAM AT A GLANCE: Make Better Land Use Decisions & Move Towards Restorative Development – join us in the City of Parksville on Vancouver Island for a field day on April 2, followed by a 2-day symposium on April 3-4 (REGISTRATION NOW CLOSED)


    “The rhythms of water are changing in British Columbia. What happens on the land in the creekshed matters to streams – thus, the time has come to reconnect hydrology and ecology! Join delegates from the east coast of Vancouver Island and beyond, and attend a ‘watershed moment’ in Parksville,” stated John Finnie, Chair, Parksville 2019 Symposium Organizing Committee.

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    DOWNLOAD DETAILED AGENDA for “Parksville 2019: Second Annual Vancouver Island Symposium on Water Stewardship in a Changing Climate – Improving Where We Live Through Restorative Land Development” (April 2-3-4, 2019) – learn why a good strategy is the path to success


    Join delegates from the east coast of Vancouver Island and beyond, and attend a ‘watershed moment’ in the City of Parksville for a field day followed by the 2-day symposium. “Delegates will learn how communities can apply science-based understanding to increase their restorative footprint and at the same time decrease their destructive footprint. Delegates will also learn about local government initiatives that are ‘getting it right’ and are moving along pathways that lead to restorative land development,” states Peter Law.

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    DOWNLOAD PROGRAM BROCHURE for “Parksville 2019: Second Annual Vancouver Island Symposium on Water Stewardship in a Changing Climate – Make Better Land Use Decisions & Move Towards Restorative Land Development” (April 2-3-4, 2019)


    “Parksville 2019 is a milestone event on a multi-year ‘convening for action’ journey,” stated Kim Stephens. “The process is incremental. Each milestone builds on the last and points the way to the next. We do, we learn, we adapt. The ripple effects of the educational approach play out over time. Hence, the importance of ongoing reinforcement and reiteration of core concepts so that everyone understands the context, the goal, and what is necessary to achieve desired outcomes. Inform, educate and inspire those who are in a position to make a difference.”

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    THE RESTORATION ECONOMY: It takes a process to create an actionable vision for community revitalization + creekshed restoration, says Storm Cunningham


    “The Partnership for Water Sustainability in British Columbia recently showed itself to be on the leading edge of watershed restoration by focusing a significant portion of their recent symposium on regional revitalization. I was asked to deliver most of that content to an audience that largely comprised Streamkeepers and other technical experts who do the on-the-ground work of restoring watersheds,” stated Storm Cunningham. Afterwards, he reflected on the connection between their work and community revitalization, and how making that connection could benefit their work.

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