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Vancouver Island Water

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WORKSHOP ON SUSTAINABLE STREAM RESTORATION, FEATURING SHELLY CREEK: “I will teach many simple techniques. Combined together they will start to replicate nature; we will all learn together,” states Dave Derrick, stream restoration innovator (April 2019)


Dave Derrick was a co-developer and co-instructor in the first American Society of Civil Engineers stream class, titled “An Introduction to Stream Investigation, Stabilization, and Restoration”. The morning lecture is a streamlined version of this course. Dave Derrick will cover the philosophy of restoration, channel dynamics and evolution, and bioengineering methods. Shelly Creek is the case study for improving in-stream hydraulic and environmental functions in fish-bearing streams along the east coast of Vancouver Island.

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WORKSHOP ON SUSTAINABLE STREAM RESTORATION, FEATURING SHELLY CREEK: “Stewardship groups have local knowledge about local water resources; and are the most invested and most connected to the land base,” states Neil Goeller, Regional Hydrologist, Province of British Columbia


“Stream gauging can be incredibly complicated, but there are some basic skills that are the foundation of flow measurements which are relatively easy to learn. Modern equipment also takes a lot of the confusing details out of the process, leaving the operator with a much more pleasant experience. A demonstration on the mid-section measurement technique will be presented along with some discussion on the myriad of factors requiring consideration when stepping into a stream with the purpose of measuring flow,” states Neil Goeller.

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WORKSHOP ON SUSTAINABLE STREAM RESTORATION, FEATURING SHELLY CREEK: “The District of North Vancouver purchased state-of-the-art equipment and trained 10 volunteers who conduct water quality sampling close to their neighbourhood,” states Richard Boase, one of three instructors for the field part of the ‘Dave Derrick workshop’


At Shelly Creek Park, a team of three instructors will demonstrate and provide hands-on training for stream investigation, flow measurement and water quality sampling. Workshop participants will be divided into three groups and rotate through a “walkabout with Dave” and demos at two streamside training stations. “We will have our YSI EXO multi probe on hand to demonstrate how to collect water quality data. We would then let attendees try the equipment while we talk about how we train streamkeeper volunteers to monitor water quality in streams close to their homes,” states Richard Boase.

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PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM SPONSOR: Mosaic Forest Management – “Maintaining ecological balance is critical for success,” states Domenico Iannidinardo


“Over 80% of the Englishman River watershed is dedicated to forest management. Applying a landscape level approach makes a working forest work for multiple values. Hydrology and ecology values are managed through conservation agreements, land sales, and cooperation with researchers and communities. A guiding objective is to ‘keep sediment out of streams’,” states Domenico Iannidinardo, Vice-President, Forest & Sustainability and Chief Forester for Mosaic.

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THE SCIENCE BEHIND THE WHOLE-SYSTEM, WATER BALANCE APPROACH: Bill Derry will co-present with Dr. Chris May at the Parksville 2019 Symposium (April 2019)


Bill Derry has a unique combination of career experience: local government innovator, consultant with cross-border experience, and, stewardship sector leader. One of the first stormwater utility managers in Washington State, he worked to convince Puget Sound local governments to create and fund research at the Center for Urban Water Resources Management. Three decades ago, Bill Derry was a pioneer in developing a science-based framework for correlating land uses changes and urban steam health.

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OUTREACH & AWARENESS RAISING FOR PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM: Op-Ed in the Vancouver Province draws province-wide attention to the call for a new land ethic such that “restorative land development results in sustainable stream stabilization” (February 26, 2019)


“Today, the scope of involvement and influence of stream stewards is expanding beyond the creek channel. What happens on the land matters to streams. Hence, stewardship groups are champions for community-scale responsibility. Given staffing and funding constraints, creative partnerships with stewardship groups are truly ‘win-win’ for local governments – especially when stewardship groups can access funding sources that local governments cannot,” states Richard Boase,

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OUTREACH & AWARENESS RAISING FOR PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM: e-Newsletter series published by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in British Columbia delves into the details of the cascading program to inform, educate and establish expectations


“The e-Newsletter series is designed to paint a picture of the field day and 2-day symposium,” states Kim Stephens. “Our hope is that delegates will take the time to read and reflect on the desired outcomes and educational objectives for the program as a whole. Also, that they will arrive in Parksville well-prepared to contribute to the ‘sharing & learning’ segments that are a feature of each day. The symposium program comprises four modules each day, and these are structured to achieve the educational objectives.”

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IMPROVING WHERE WE LIVE: Bowker Creek and Brooklyn Creek are “beacons of hope” on Vancouver Island / Learn more at Parksville 2019 (Announcement #8, March 2019)


“The Town of Comox is being proactive in changing development practices. This is demonstrated by the training course that the Town held for drainage and land development engineers. Because the course comprised six sessions over a 3-month period, participation required a major commitment of their time,” stated Marvin Kamenz. “The Town hosted this training because the planning and design process is becoming increasingly more complex, and with greater expectations than we have ever applied to drainage infrastructure.”

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OUTREACH & AWARENESS RAISING FOR PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM: The bottom-line is that decades of in-stream enhancement work will not be enduring if hydrological function is not restored – Asset Management BC Newsletter spreads word about a “watershed moment”


“A goal of restorative land development would be to restore the integrity of the natural water balance. If this work is done right, it should be possible to: first, halt ecosystem decline; and after that, bend the trend-line in an upwards direction,” states Paul Chapman. “Guided by a whole-system, water balance approach, restorative land development would reconnect hydrology and ecology. Connecting dots, then, a key message is that restorative land development results in sustainable stream restoration.”

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IMPROVING WHERE WE LIVE: “Closing the Data Gap: Water Stewards, the Key to the Future” / Learn more at the Parksville 2019 Symposium (Announcement #7, February 2019)


“Understanding the complex interactions of whole-system, water balance processes that lead to water availability in and on the ground, and all the values that depend on it, is critical to effective water resource allocation. My vision is to develop relationships and partnerships with stewardship groups, local governments, federal government and First Nations to expand our collection and understanding of data,” states Neil Goeller. “Involving stewardship groups in streamflow measurement would fill a gap at the micro-scale where flow data are sparse to non-existent.”

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