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MODULE A – DAY TWO – PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM: “In the RDN part of the program, delegates will contribute to the visioning of the next decade of Drinking Water and Watershed Protection in the Nanaimo region,” states Julie Pisani, DWWP Coordinator, Regional District of Nanaimo


“An important aspect of the Drinking Water & Watershed Protection program is that it is regional in nature, with a focus on the natural boundaries of watersheds and aquifers to frame program activities, rather than political boundaries. All four member municipalities and all seven Electoral Areas are partners in this region-wide function, recognizing the water does not conform to jurisdictional lines. Protecting and planning for our water requires a high level of collaboration,” states Julie Pisani.

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MODULE B – DAY TWO – PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM: A Panel & Town-Hall Session on “Improving Where We Live” features five Vancouver Island initiatives to demonstrate what is possible through a Whole-System Approach


“A vision for restorative land development could be guided by the mantra: Sustainable is attainable. We can make where we live better. While communities cannot restore lost biodiversity, they can halt its decline and consciously direct efforts into bending the trend-line in an upwards direction. ‘Getting it right’ is a process that requires long-term commitment, patience and perseverance by champions,” states Kim Stephens. “Inspirational in scope, five Vancouver Island initiatives demonstrate what is achievable when there is a restoration imperative.”

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MODULE C – DAY TWO – PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM: Beacons of Hope – Bowker Creek and Brooklyn Creek restoration success stories on Vancouver Island are inspirational because they demonstrate how local government partnerships with stewardship groups can be transformational


Bowker and Brooklyn restoration are provincially significant precedents. Each has a long history. Each demonstrates how local government partnerships with stewardship groups can be transformational and ‘improve where we live’. These precedents represent a range of situations – Bowker is an urban setting and Brooklyn is in a suburban setting. “The Bowker Creek Urban Watershed Renewal Initiative serves as a ‘how-to-guide’ for a ‘top-down and bottom-up’ approach that connects with the community and gets the vision right,” states Jody Watson.

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MODULE D – DAY TWO – PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM: “In the late ’90s, I began noticing a miraculous new trend: a number of places – both ecosystems and communities – were actually getting better, some spectacularly so,” stated Storm Cunningham, author & global thought leader


Essential ingredients for restorative land development encompass vision, strategy to deliver the vision, and commitment to implement an ongoing program. “Visionaries, designers, planners, policy makers, and project managers abound. Strategists are rare. As a result, resilience and revitalization efforts often fail due to 1) bad strategy, and 2) no strategy. Strategies are our path to success. They become our primary interface with the world. Thus, what we restore, restores us. What we revitalize, revitalizes us,” states Storm Cunningham.

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SUSTAINABLE STREAM RESTORATION: Parksville 2019 Symposium organizing committee releases the Detailed Agenda for Day One (April 3) – “Getting It Right by Applying the Whole-System Approach”


“Reconnect hydrology and ecology – what happens on the land in the creekshed matters to streams! That is the over-arching message for Day One of the symposium,’ states Paul Chapman of the Parksville 2019 Organizing Committee. “In opening the symposium, I will be reporting out on one of the substantial outcomes of the Nanaimo 2018 Symposium. Galvanized by what they learned, a diverse group of stewardship groups formed a ‘creekshed coalition’, united by water, before leaving the symposium.”

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MODULE A – DAY ONE – PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM: The unifying theme for three cascading presentations by Kim Stephens, Paul Chapman and Chris May is “Getting It Right – The Whole-System Approach”


The opening presentation by Kim Stephens provides the bridge from the Nanaimo 2018 Symposium. “In leading off Module A, I will be looking back in order to look ahead. This means that I will re-cap the highlights from Nanaimo 2018 in order to frame expectations for Parksville 2019,” states Kim Stephens. “Three key messages from Nanaimo 2018 are: An informed and educated stewardship sector is a catalyst for action. Align efforts to re-establish creekshed function in the mid-Island region. Learn from those who are leading change. These takeaways also apply to Parksville 2019.”

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MODULE B – DAY ONE – PARKSVILLE 2019: A Panel & Town-Hall Session on “Watershed Health and You” features the Englishman River integrated system, to demonstrate that what happens on the land in a watershed (and in its tributary creeksheds) matters to streams


“Each panel member has 5 minutes to tell his or her part of the panel storyline. The objective in ‘presenting at them’ is to prime the audience for town-hall interaction. Hence, the panel presentations must be streamlined and past-paced,” states Kim Stephens. “We want the audience to be champing at the bit to have a conversation to learn more. So, we are asking panel members to apply the Ignite format. The result will be a fast and fun set of presentations. For most speakers, having slides on a timer forces them to be far more concise and thoughtful than they would in any other format.”

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WATER STEWARDSHIP IN A CHANGING CLIMATE: North Vancouver District’s Richard Boase returns as the moderator for the Parksville 2019 Symposium


Richard Boase brings three ingredients to the role of Symposium moderator: passion, enthusiasm and a sense of humour. “I am very excited to have been asked to continue my moderator role at Parksville 2019.  The momentum and excitement gained in Nanaimo last year has produced results.  I expect to hear from many of our delegates who have been embracing the Hard Work of Hope this past year.  From citizen science to innovative stream restoration methods and hydrology, Parksville 2019 is the highlight of my year,” states Richard Boase.

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MODULE C – DAY ONE – PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM: The context for a mini-workshop within the symposium is “Make Better Decisions: First, Understand How Rain Reaches a Stream”


“Stewardship groups have local knowledge about local water resources; and are the most invested and most connected to the land base. Participation in streamflow data collection is a way to educate them about creekshed hydrology, in particular correct data collection techniques and their importance for refining the water balance and understanding what the numbers mean. This would create understanding that would enhance their effectiveness as champions for reconnecting hydrology and ecology,” stated Neil Goeller.

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MODULE D – DAY ONE – PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM: The over-arching theme for the concluding presentation by Nick Leone that provides the bridge to Day Two is “Back to the Future: Reconnect Hydrology and Ecology”


“Opportunities to support continued dialogue, engagement and advancements in innovation across professional disciplines and jurisdictions engaged in water management, conservation and sustainability is of vital importance and genuine benefit,” states Nick Leone. “Going forward we will need to think and act more strategically to account for uncertainty through acknowledging what we don’t know, and variability in what we do know; and develop effective partnerships that get the vision right and produce sound strategies,” states Nick Leone. “

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