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Vancouver Island Water

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Surface Water Quality Trend Analysis in the Regional District of Nanaimo: “The research confirmed the importance of intact riparian corridors and undisturbed forested lands to stream health in the Nanaimo region,” stated the report authors


“Started in 2011, the long-term goal of the Community Watershed Monitoring Network is to identify trends in water quality to assist in regional land use planning and restoration decisions. The sampling is done by trained volunteers from 13 stewardship groups,” stated Julie Pisani. “For the years 2011-2017, statistical modelling of water quality in the summer and fall sampling periods indicated that land use types associated with human disturbance were important predictors of dissolved oxygen, temperature, turbidity and specific conductivity.”

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JOIN US AT THE PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM FOR A WATERSHED MOMENT (April 2-3-4): While BC communities may not be able to restore lost biodiversity, they can certainly halt its decline and consciously direct efforts toward a richer future, that is: “make where we live better” (news release, November 2018)


“At the Parksville 2019 Symposium, you will learn how communities can apply science-based understanding to increase their restorative footprint and at the same time decrease their destructive footprint. You will also learn about local government initiatives that are ‘getting it right’ and are moving along pathways that lead to restorative development,” stated Peter Law, President, Mid Vancouver Island Habitat Enhancement Society (MVIHES).

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Kus-kus-sum Restoration on the Courtenay River on Vancouver Island: “Being stewards of the lands and waters, it is inherently our duty to restore and assist in the rehabilitation of the natural habitat of the salmon and various marine and wildlife in this area,” stated Chief Councillor Nicole Rempel, K’ómoks First Nation


“K’ómoks First Nation believes in partnerships, particularly when partnerships involve like-minded groups that share similar vision. It is in this spirit that we are happy to sign this collaborative agreement with the City of Courtenay and Project Watershed on behalf of our membership for the management and restoration of Kus-kus-sum,” states Chief Councillor Nicole Rempel, K’ómoks First Nation. “Restoring this cultural and historically significant site is a vision KFN shares with Project Watershed and the City of Courtenay. KFN’s interest in the site is largely based on its strong cultural significance.”

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KUS-KUS-SUM RESTORATION ON THE COURTENAY RIVER: “Turning the tides to de-industrialize the estuary in the heart of our community” – an article by Tim Ennis, Executive Director of the Comox Valley Land Trust


“The Field Sawmill was once the economic heart of the Comox Valley. It employed hundreds of people directly, and was the centrepiece of the local forest industry,” wrote Tim Ennis. “The Comox Valley Project Watershed Society and the K’ómoks First Nation share a dream for the future of the Field Sawmill site. Known to the K’ómoks people as Kus-kus-sum, the property holds deep significance. They are working to find a conservation solution to this complex real estate problem.”

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RESTORATIVE DEVELOPMENT: Local government initiatives on Vancouver Island are “getting it right” / Learn more at Parksville 2019 (Announcement #2, November 2018)


“At the Parksville 2019 Symposium, you will learn how communities can apply science-based understanding to increase their restorative footprint and at the same time decrease their destructive footprint. You will also learn about local government initiatives that are ‘getting it right’ and are moving along pathways that lead to restorative development,” stated Paul Chapman. “The daily symposium themes are Sustainable Stream Restoration and Restorative Land Development, respectively. An evening lecture by Storm Cunningham is the bridge between the two days.”

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JOIN US FOR A WATERSHED MOMENT: Parksville 2019 / Second Annual Vancouver Island Symposium / Water Stewardship / Restorative Development / April 2-3-4 (Announcement #1, November 2018)


The rhythms of water are changing in British Columbia. What happens on the land in the creekshed does matter to streams – thus, the time has come to reconnect hydrology and ecology! Yes, communities can decrease their destructive footprint while increasing their restoration footprint. “A decade of effort on Vancouver Island, by partnerships of local governments and community stewards, is demonstrating success on the ground where it matters,” stated John Finnie. “Parksville 2019 will celebrate success stories are that characterized by three attributes: commitment, collaboration and the ‘hard work of hope’.”

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JOIN US FOR A WATERSHED MOMENT AT “PARKSVILLE 2019”: British Columbia’s Professional Governance Act in combination with a vision for ‘restorative land development’ set the stage for 2nd Annual Vancouver Island Symposium on Water Stewardship in a Changing Climate


“One major aspect of the Professional Reliance Review was to examine professional governance issues in the natural resource sector, involving the regulation by professional associations of agrologists, biologists, engineers, geoscientists, foresters and applied science technicians and technologists,” stated Mark Haddock.”My review also examined natural resource regulations and how they incorporate and rely on professionals external to government, who are usually employees or consultants to those carrying out resource development activities or activities that are regulated because they affect the environment.”

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JOIN US FOR A WATERSHED MOMENT AT THE ‘PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM’: Cross-border collaboration expands our horizons and connects us with a larger body of experience!


The program design for the Parksville 2019 Symposium builds on a large body of collaborative work undertaken over decades in British Columbia and Washington State. When creekshed protection policies and practices are based on an understanding of WHY and HOW hydrology is the engine that powers ecological services, then they would be effective in achieving desired outcomes. Parksville 2018 will celebrate local government initiatives that are ‘getting it right’. Follow the leaders!

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WHAT HAPPENS ON THE LAND DOES MATTER! – hosted by Forester University (May 2017), the Water Balance Webinar from British Columbia introduced a North American audience to the methodology that underpins vision for “Sustainable Watershed Systems, through Asset Management” – the Whole-System, Water Balance approach simplifies things down to an understanding of the consequences of changes in duration of flow!


The Partnership for Water Sustainability in British Columbia partnered with Forester University to share, via webcast, the BC innovation and experience that has resulted in the whole-system, water balance approach. “We are delighted to have Kim Stephens and Jim Dumont share British Columbia’s cutting-edge continuous simulation model, known as the Water Balance Methodology,” stated Emily Shine. “At Forester University, we aim to position ourselves at the forefront of innovation in rainwater management and green infrastructure, and that is why we are calling Water Balance Methodology a webinar that cannot be missed.”

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JOIN US FOR A WATERSHED MOMENT AT “PARKSVILLE 2019”: What happens on the land matters – “We can decrease our Destructive Footprint while increasing our Restoration Footprint,” said Storm Cunningham when providing a restorative development context for reconnecting hydrology to ecology in order to re-establish creekshed function in a changing climate


“A long time ago, I had a conversation with the University of British Columbia’s Bill Rees. He is known world-wide for creating the ecological footprint concept,” recalled Storm Cunningham. “The whole idea of reducing our footprint is great, I said to Bill, but what about the flip side? Shouldn’t we also be measuring the restorative effects that our society, and our economy, are having? My point was that, at the same time as we are decreasing our destructive footprint, we can also be increasing our restoration footprint. That is a core message of restorative development.”

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