Category:

Parksville Water Stewardship Symposium

PARKSVILLE 2019 EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES AT A GLANCE: “We wanted delegates to absorb and reflect on what was most important. The results of the online survey immediately after the symposium confirm that the educational objectives were achieved in spades,” stated Kim Stephens


“We organized each day as four modules in order to proceed at a relaxed pace by allowing ample time for each module. Each had an educational objective. Because memories are short, each morning and afternoon session kicked off with a 15-minute context presentation. These set the scene for what was to come, while at the same reminding delegates of the big picture,” stated Kim Stephens. “The educational objectives helped to inform and establish expectations. It was a matter of providing context and then being clear and succinct about the desired takeaways.”

Read Article

DOWNLOAD POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS: Parksville 2019 – Second Annual Vancouver Island Symposium on Water Stewardship in a Changing Climate (April 2-3-4, 2019)


“It truly was a watershed moment at Parksville 2019. We set out to attract an audience balanced across sectors, demonstrate the power of collaboration between the stewardship sector and local governments, and create an environment for sharing and learning from each other. We achieved all three objectives,” stated John Finnie. “Parksville 2019 demonstrated that a group with different backgrounds and responsibilities can share a common learning experience and agree on strategies for water stewardship and stream restoration.”

Read Article

SHOWCASING SHELLY CREEK THROUGH A VIDEO SERIES: “Water is fluid, active and mercurial. Show it that way, the good and bad, so people can relate to challenges in their neighbourhoods and help address them through active engagement,” states David Mackenzie, videographer


“If the community comprehends the issues at hand, and the solutions that are needed, then leaders may be able to establish a support base that can help move watershed sustainability in the right direction within the community,” observes David Mackenzie. “Visual media forms, such as photography and videography, are well suited as environmental evidence for what is going wrong in watersheds. But also, can show what success can look like when restoration is achieved. One cannot attract supporters through just words and bullets on PowerPoint slides. Visual media is the way to do this today.”

Read Article

CONVENING FOR ACTION AT PARKSVILLE 2019: Mayor Ed Mayne to open symposium with a “welcome to Parksville”


The Mayor recognizes that the Symposium is timely in terms of celebrating the opening of the new Englishman River Water Service treatment plant. He is proud that the City’s contribution to the success of the Symposium is the guided tours of the river intake and water treatment facilities. Operation of the Englishman River Water Service is guided by this statement: “An environmentally sensitive use of water to improve fish habitat and domestic water supply”. At a time when the climate is changing, it is a balancing act to achieve both outcomes when summers are longer and drier.

Read Article

REGENERATION AND RESTORATION IN ACTION: Storm Cunningham is coming to British Columbia to inspire audiences to “improve where we live” (Announcement #9, March 2019)


“The Restoration Economy introduced the huge and multifaceted industrial opportunity that gave the book its title. It was the first book to encompass restoration of both built and natural environments, documenting the crises, disciplines and industries that lie beneath what I see as a global trend toward renewal,” states Storm Cunningham. “In reWealth! I make a clear distinction between dewealth and rewealth economies.”

Read Article

WORKSHOP ON SUSTAINABLE STREAM RESTORATION, FEATURING SHELLY CREEK: “I will teach many simple techniques. Combined together they will start to replicate nature; we will all learn together,” states Dave Derrick, stream restoration innovator (April 2019)


Dave Derrick was a co-developer and co-instructor in the first American Society of Civil Engineers stream class, titled “An Introduction to Stream Investigation, Stabilization, and Restoration”. The morning lecture is a streamlined version of this course. Dave Derrick will cover the philosophy of restoration, channel dynamics and evolution, and bioengineering methods. Shelly Creek is the case study for improving in-stream hydraulic and environmental functions in fish-bearing streams along the east coast of Vancouver Island.

Read Article

WORKSHOP ON SUSTAINABLE STREAM RESTORATION, FEATURING SHELLY CREEK: “Stewardship groups have local knowledge about local water resources; and are the most invested and most connected to the land base,” states Neil Goeller, Regional Hydrologist, Province of British Columbia


“Stream gauging can be incredibly complicated, but there are some basic skills that are the foundation of flow measurements which are relatively easy to learn. Modern equipment also takes a lot of the confusing details out of the process, leaving the operator with a much more pleasant experience. A demonstration on the mid-section measurement technique will be presented along with some discussion on the myriad of factors requiring consideration when stepping into a stream with the purpose of measuring flow,” states Neil Goeller.

Read Article

WORKSHOP ON SUSTAINABLE STREAM RESTORATION, FEATURING SHELLY CREEK: “The District of North Vancouver purchased state-of-the-art equipment and trained 10 volunteers who conduct water quality sampling close to their neighbourhood,” states Richard Boase, one of three instructors for the field part of the ‘Dave Derrick workshop’


At Shelly Creek Park, a team of three instructors will demonstrate and provide hands-on training for stream investigation, flow measurement and water quality sampling. Workshop participants will be divided into three groups and rotate through a “walkabout with Dave” and demos at two streamside training stations. “We will have our YSI EXO multi probe on hand to demonstrate how to collect water quality data. We would then let attendees try the equipment while we talk about how we train streamkeeper volunteers to monitor water quality in streams close to their homes,” states Richard Boase.

Read Article

PARKSVILLE 2019 SYMPOSIUM SPONSOR: Mosaic Forest Management – “Maintaining ecological balance is critical for success,” states Domenico Iannidinardo


“Over 80% of the Englishman River watershed is dedicated to forest management. Applying a landscape level approach makes a working forest work for multiple values. Hydrology and ecology values are managed through conservation agreements, land sales, and cooperation with researchers and communities. A guiding objective is to ‘keep sediment out of streams’,” states Domenico Iannidinardo, Vice-President, Forest & Sustainability and Chief Forester for Mosaic.

Read Article

THE SCIENCE BEHIND THE WHOLE-SYSTEM, WATER BALANCE APPROACH: Bill Derry will co-present with Dr. Chris May at the Parksville 2019 Symposium (April 2019)


Bill Derry has a unique combination of career experience: local government innovator, consultant with cross-border experience, and, stewardship sector leader. One of the first stormwater utility managers in Washington State, he worked to convince Puget Sound local governments to create and fund research at the Center for Urban Water Resources Management. Three decades ago, Bill Derry was a pioneer in developing a science-based framework for correlating land uses changes and urban steam health.

Read Article