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Sustainable Watershed Systems, through Asset Management

BACKGROUNDER SERIES ON SUSTAINABLE WATERSHED SYSTEMS: Watershed Moments – Something really good is happening in British Columbia (released in April 2017)


“We cannot forget that there has been a huge investment in what we now know is an unsustainable status quo. Investment must now be shifted towards restoration that uses the forces of nature itself to help build more efficiently integrated infrastructure that as much as possible maintains itself. What a gift to the world that would be,” stated Bob Sandford. “If you want to live here in perpetuity, then you need to do this. Do not forget the urgency.”

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BEYOND THE GUIDEBOOK 2015: Moving Towards “Sustainable Watershed Systems, through Asset Management” (released Nov 2015)


“This is superlative work. It records so much in visual and conversational ways that everyone who reads it will see how changes are informed and guided towards collaborative action to achieve real results. You have connected the dots enabling those who were part of the stories to see how they have contributed in so many meaningful ways for themselves and their communities of place and practice,” stated Erik Karlsen.

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BEYOND THE GUIDEBOOK PRIMER SERIES – Sustainable Watershed Systems: Primer on Application of Ecosystem-based Understanding in the Georgia Basin (released in September 2016)


“An interface is needed to translate the complex products of science into achievable goals and implementable solution for practical resource management. This interface is what we now call a science-based understanding,” stated Peter Law. “Understanding how land development impacts watershed hydrology and the functions of aquatic ecosystems provides a solid basis for making decisions to guide action where and when it is most needed.”

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BACKGROUNDER SERIES ON SUSTAINABLE WATERSHED SYSTEMS: Cross-border collaboration would enhance water resources research and practice in North America (released in April 2017)


“British Columbia’s Water Balance Model is an outstanding initiative, and I think it is clearly unique in the way it has delivered technology for water resource practitioners on-line dating back to 2003,” stated Dr. Charles Rowney, Director of Operations for ncimm.org. “We will certainly tap into the Water Balance Model experience as the Center explores options for SWMM and EPANET deployment beyond the desktop.”

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BACKGROUNDER SERIES ON SUSTAINABLE WATERSHED SYSTEMS: Governments of Canada and British Columbia fund Georgia Basin Inter-Regional Education Initiative (released in April 2017)


“Infrastructure is the foundation of the Canada we all want to build for tomorrow. Both large and small communities can find it challenging to fund much needed water and wastewater infrastructure, which is why the Clean Water and Wastewater Fund is so important. This latest round of approved projects will protect the environment and keep communities in British Columbia healthy,” stated the Hon. Amarjeet Sohi, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities.

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BACKGROUNDER SERIES ON SUSTAINABLE WATERSHED SYSTEMS: Stormwater Impacts Communities and Creeks-What Can Streamkeepers Do? (released in March 2017)


“Our objective in hosting the workshop was to raise awareness about ways to better manage rainwater runoff, maintain stream health and support watershed-based plans,” stated Barbara Frisken. “The workshop introduced community members to a vision for Sustainable Watershed Systems and what it means to value watersheds as infrastructure elements. Breakout groups then identified possible community actions for improving watersheds.”

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BACKGROUNDER SERIES ON SUSTAINABLE WATERSHED SYSTEMS: Comox Valley Eco-Asset Management Symposium – Discovering Nature’s Infrastructure Potential (released in February 2017)


The Symposium introduced participants to Sustainable Watershed Systems, through Asset Management. “The purpose of the Symposium is to build local knowledge and interest in how to apply eco-asset management principles at the local level,” states Tim Ennis, Executive Director, Comox Valley Land Trust. “The Symposium is very much about setting in motion a mind-set change. It is therefore essential that everyone steps back and sees the big picture.”

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BACKGROUNDER SERIES ON SUSTAINABLE WATERSHED SYSTEMS: “Sustainable Watershed Systems, through Asset Management” – Local stream stewardship volunteers may yet be the difference-maker (released in February 2017)


“The stewardship community can work with local governments to inform the broader community,” stated ZoAnn Morten. “We can open eyes and minds. We can open doors so that together we can make the changes necessary to achieve a vision for a watershed. It is the streamkeepers who have the on-the-ground knowledge needed to establish restoration priorities within a watershed. That is the key to benefitting from local input.”

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ASSET MANAGEMENT BC NEWSLETTER (January 2017) – Opinion: Vision for “Sustainable Watershed Systems” resonates with audiences in BC and beyond


“At the dawn of 2017, the purpose of this article was two-fold: take stock of our progress in 2016 to inform and educate; and foreshadow where we may be at year-end,” stated Kim Stephens. “Early uptake of the vision for Sustainable Watershed Systems has exceeded our expectations. There is clearly interest and an appetite to learn more. It is an idea whose time has come. The desired outcome that would flow from Sustainable Watershed Systems is a water-resilient future.”

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SITELINES MAGAZINE (October 2016): “Green + Blue Parallels from Down Under” – reflections by Kim Stephens on his keynote address at a national conference in Australia


“In his article, Kim Stephens draws parallels between made-in-BC solutions and those ‘Down Under’, noting cultural differences but the common need to adapt,” explained Julie Schooling, issue editor. He introduced Australians to three ‘big ideas’ that underpin where we are heading in BC, namely: Primacy of Hydrology, Shifting Baseline Syndrome, and Cathedral Thinking. The three are interconnected. The outcome would be Sustainable Watershed Systems.

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