Archive:

2015

FLASHBACK TO 2007: At Water Balance Model Partners Forum, Environment Canada's Laura Maclean provided perspective on how relationships underpin changes in land development practices


“The experience of the Greater Vancouver region shows how important it is to have a way to bring the right people together at the right time, and in so doing build a network that can make things happen. Looking back, much of what we have collectively accomplished in recent years in the field of rainwater management can be traced back to relationships,” stated Laura Maclean. “We now see a comparable relationship-building process taking shape on Vancouver Island.”

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FLASHBACK TO 2007: At Water Balance Model Partners Forum, Ted van der Gulik stated that use of the tool demonstrates how to achieve a light hydrologic footprint


“The Water Balance Model has emerged as the rainwater management tool of choice in making land development decisions that meet the test of being sustainable, affordable and achievable. The Model helps practitioners wrap their minds around how to implement ‘green solutions’. Because the vision of the IGP is to promote changes in land development practices, the Water Balance Model can be described as a means to an end,” stated Ted van der Gulik.

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Article published in 2008 explained how "Water Balance Model powered by QUALHYMO" integrates the site with the watershed and the stream


The article provides a concise overview of considerations that have led to integration of two hydrologic models. “The tool underpins ‘Beyond the Guidebook: The New Business As Usual (2007)’, a provincial initiative to advance implementation of green infrastructure policies and practices throughout British Columbia. The mantra for this provincial initiative is: Today’s Expectations are Tomorrow’s Standards,” stated Paul Ham.

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"We have been investigating the environmental benefits of trees in urban areas, and their role in climate-proofing our cities," reports Professor Roland Ennos, University of Hull


“To determine whether the humble tree really can provide such robust defences, we first need to understand the role they play in soaking up excess rain water. All floods, whether fluvial (when rivers burst their banks) or pluvial (when rainfall overwhelms drainage systems before it reaches rivers), are caused because the rain cannot soak into the soil fast enough. Instead, it runs rapidly over the surface of the land,” wrote Roland Ennos.

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Green Infrastructure in the United Kingdom: Landscape Institute calls for landscape-based solution in addressing the challenges of the 21st century


“We need to look at the larger catchment management issues and how forestry, land management and soft engineered flood alleviation schemes can hold back water in the upper reaches of rivers. We need to comprehensively retro-fit Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) and require it to be used for all new building schemes,” stated Sue Illman.

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"We often take trees and green spaces for granted, but we shouldn’t," writes David Suzuki


“Urban forests contribute greatly to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Urban trees also help us adapt to and cope with climate change impacts by shading communities during periods of extreme heat. The unique, multi-purpose benefits of living, green infrastructure make it an incredibly valuable tool for cities and towns to improve resiliency in the face of climate change,” says David Suzuki.

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Designing with Nature in Detroit: Innovative approach to incorporating green infrastructure captures rainwater while beautifying neighborhoods


“I am overjoyed when I look at these projects and think about what they are doing. One thing that we have in this city is land. We have tons and tons of land. And being able to make that land productive is going to be an amazing benefit for us in the future. So I hope that we can continue to do these types of projects and that we can inspire others to do them, as well," said Palencia Mobley.

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Beyond the Guidebook 2015 presents Time-Lines and Milestones for each regional "convening for action" story


“Each regional time-line identifies milestones in the building blocks process. In addition, there is an overall or over-arching provincial storyline that links the five regional stories. Provincial milestones provide the basic structure and backbone that carries through each of the stories within the story. The aspect or element that unifies the regional stories is the ‘convening for action’ program which is what inter-regional collaboration is about,” states Kim Stephens.

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Capture Rain Where It Falls: At 2007 Water Balance Model Partners Forum, Ted van der Gulik and Jim Dumont explained development and application of Performance Targets


“We have observed that the power of the Water Balance Model process lies in the conversations that result from users generating a single number – the percentage of rainfall that becomes runoff – that represents the synthesis of any particular scenario. Comparison of scenarios creates understanding, especially when the focus is on the hydrologic implications of the assumptions that underpin those percentages,” stated Ted van der Gulik.

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Capture Rain Where It Falls: At 2007 Water Balance Model Partners Forum, Ministry of Environment's Peter Law provided historical context for Performance Target Methodology


“When we wrote the Guidebook, we recognized there is a material difference in the characterization of surface runoff that originates from an individual development site versus flow that you see at a catchment or watershed scale. What you see in a watercourse is the total flow – that is, water that flows overland plus water that moves through soil until it daylights,” stated Peter Law.

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