Archive:

2007

Urban Density, Meteorology, and Rooftops

In recent years, there has been a recognition in Australia and elsewhere of the many favourable aspects of denser urban development, and a corresponding move towards promoting it in urban plans such as Melbourne 2030. In a paper by Carol Skinner, published in Urban Research and Policy in September 2006, the many appealing aspects of denser cities are summarised.

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Washington State conference showcases British Columbia approach to rainwater management


The pilot for Beyond the Guidebook is the City of Surrey’s Fergus Creek Watershed Plan. The plan is precedent-setting because there will be no large-scale storage ponds. “Rather, rainwater runoff volume will be managed through constructed facilities and the creation of contiguous large-scale greenways that have been integrated into the area’s land use plan”, stated Remi Dube.

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Climate Change Adaptation and Urban Reforestation in Delta, British Columbia

About 1/3 of the urban landscape is typically covered by road rights-of-way. This creates opportunities to capture rain where it falls and restore it to natural hydrologic pathways. In British Columbia, Delta municipality is planting an urban forest to mitigate climate change. Delta has set a goal to plant 20,100 trees by the year 2010.

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Convening for Action on Vancouver Island

CAVI is the acronym for Convening for Action on Vancouver Island. CAVI is a regional pilot program that is being implemented under the umbrella of the “Water Sustainability Action Plan for British Columbia”. The purpose of CAVI is to provide research and education for practitioners (primarily local government administrators, engineers, planners and elected officials) so that they can plan for sustainable water resources in the context of burgeoning settlement activity.

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Green Infrastructure Community-of-Interest

The Green Infrastructure Community-of-Interest is the web-delivery vehicle for the Green Infrastructure Partnership. The notion of a web-based Community-of-Interest (COI) has been developed to respond to the needs of organizational clusters which evolve to discuss and communicate ideas around a specific issue. The Green Infrastructure COI includes additional web links that are relevant to the practice of rainwater management.

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Canadian Water Network Launched Pan-Canadian Initiative at University of British Columbia Conference & Workshop (June 2007): Jim Dumont explained the innovations underpinning the City of Surrey’s Fergus Creek Watershed Plan, pilot for the ‘Beyond the Guidebook Initiative’


A team led by Dr. Hans Schreier of the University of British Columbia (UBC) kicked off a national ‘knowledge translation strategy’ for rainwater management when it convened a pre-conference workshop, conference and field tour in June 2007 in Vancouver. From a British Columbia perspective, the event design had a distinct Water Balance Model flavour. “Jim Dumont explained why and how the Fergus Creek watershed plan for the City of Surrey is based entirely on implementing ‘green solutions’ as an alternative to conventional engineered ‘blue solutions’,” stated Hans Schreier.

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Overcoming Fear and Doubt to Implement Changes in Infrastructure Standards


“Circa 2000-2001, the mantra in BC was “overcoming fear and doubt” in order to move ahead with projects such as the East Clayton Sustainable Community in Surrey, and UniverCity at Simon Fraser University on Burnaby Mountain. Translating high expectations into practical design guidelines meant revisiting accepted drainage engineering practice,” stated Kim Stephens.

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Overcoming Fear and Doubt to Implement Changes in Infrastructure Standards


“During the period 2000-2001, the mantra in British Columbia was ‘overcoming fear and doubt’ in order to move ahead with projects such as the East Clayton Sustainable Community in the City of Surrey, and UniverCity at Simon Fraser University on Burnaby Mountain in the City of Burnaby. In 2000, translating high expectations into practical design guidelines meant revisiting accepted drainage engineering practice,” stated Kim Stephens.

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