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Contextual Resources

FLASHBACK TO 2007: BC Green Infrastructure Partnership promoted a new way-of-way thinking about land development —— prelude to the Ecological Accounting Protocol


To develop a common understanding, the Green Infrastructure Partnership unveiled a cascading hierarchy. “Desired outcomes for water sustainability and green infrastructure can be achieved through infrastructure standards that reflect a full and proper understanding of the relationship between land and water”, stated Kim Stephens.

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Water is a Form-Maker: Partnership for Water Sustainability showcased Ecological Accounting Protocol at FLOWnGROW workshop in the Okanagan (Nov 2016)


“Whether discussing the economy or ecological challenges, the significance and relevance of the findings from Flow and Grow is that they will be replicable throughout the province and beyond,” stated Ted van der Gulik. “The reason for this applicability is that the workshop focus was on the impacts of climate change and the need to plan now for a water sustainable future.”

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Ian McHarg’s “Design With Nature” vision has influenced development of the Ecological Accounting Protocol


Renowned landscape architect, writer and educator Ian L. McHarg (1920-2001) was best known for introducing environmental concerns in landscape architecture. His 1969 book Design With Nature pioneered the concept of environmental planning. “The title contains a gradient of meaning. It can be interpreted as simply descriptive of a planning method, deferential to places and peoples, it can invoke the Grand Design, it can emphasize the conjunction with and, finally it can be read as an imperative. DESIGN WITH NATURE!,” wrote Ian McHarg.

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FLASHBACK TO 2009: How does a community weigh the benefits and liabilities of change driven by demand for land use? – contextual article by Tim Pringle is a foundation piece for Ecological Accounting Protocol


The key principle is that settlement and ecology are equal values and they must be as much in balance as possible for wellbeing of human and natural systems. “If we were in fact measuring ecological values, there would be more ‘weights’ (reliable data) on the ecology side of the balance scale; thus leading to more informed conclusions and hence different decisions,” stated Tim Pringle.

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