Category:

…2022

DOWNLOAD A COPY: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: How We Transform the Land – Intergenerational Vision to Change Standards of Practice” – released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in February 2022


“Today, what we as leaders do, will resound for the people of the future, their cities and their regions. In fact, for the world at large. One of the reasons that I ran for office in 1972, and why I served for 20 years as Mayor of Delta, and 7 years at Chair of Metro Vancouver was ‘to make a difference’…. a difference to the children and their families of the future. We must also consider that we are not the only ones sharing this planet, and what we do on a daily basis, can impact positively or negatively having a resounding effect and rippling effect of which we must be aware,” stated Lois Jackson.

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ARTICLE: “Profile in Courage – Oak Bay’s Sustainable Funding Plan for Infrastructure Replacement” (Asset Management BC Newsletter, Winter 2022)


“Anybody who is going to hear or read about the Oak Bay story, the thing that they really must understand is the role of Council. There is a special type of courage that Council needs to have to say, ‘give us the naked truth’. There is not a lot of political up-side to shining a light on infrastructure challenges. Oak Bay Council did that, no holds barred. They wanted to know what the situation was. And so that clearly demonstrates a strong commitment to an asset management culture in Oak Bay which is growing day by day. Oak Bay’s driver for action is the $463 million cumulative infrastructure funding gap,” stated Christopher Paine.

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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: Design With Nature Framework for Integrating Across Infrastructure Systems” – released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in February 2022


“The story of EAP, the Ecological Accounting Process, is how we got to the idea of the stream corridor system as a Natural Commons and connecting it to the challenge for streams to survive in an urban or urbanizing setting. The driver is degradation of stream channels and streamside riparian setback zones. EAP establishes the methodology and metrics for tackling the Riparian Deficit,. The strength of EAP is in how it looks at and values streams as systems, as natural commons assets, and as a land use. A stream corridor is a land use because it is defined in regulations and has a financial value,” explained Tim Pringle.

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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: Oral history extends the period of record and our understanding of what the data mean” – released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in February 2022


“Interweaving means bring together two different ways of knowing into one new concept that weaves the strengths of both ways of knowing, rather than criticizing one or the other; or trying to make them compete. It is a more collaborative way of knowing. There is a sense of humility that comes with interweaving and acknowledging that Western science is not the only way of knowing. There are other ways of knowing. And so, the humility part is interweaving the strengths of those other ways,” stated Michael Blackstock.

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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: A Network Allows People to Move Out of Workplace Silos” – released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in February 2022


“Often, silos are self-imposed by people with an absence of historical knowledge that results in a fear of failure and the subsequent criticism. People in one silo now tend to not interact with colleagues in other silos, both within their own workforce and in their greater community. In today’s world, it is the norm for many people to exit training programs and find themselves in managerial roles without the benefit of exposure to field experience that would give them both a strong basis and confidence upon which to make decisions,” stated Joe McGowan.

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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: The Little Creek That Could” – released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in January 2022


“The challenges we face today are immense, but we just have to keep plugging away. I spend so much time with children; that is one of the reasons that led me to write the book The Little Creek That Could. The book speaks to the fact that nature can heal itself if only given a chance. It is a positive and hopeful message for kids. I also think it is very timely given where we are in time. While this book focuses on healing a single stream, the broader message is about healing the environment. My hope is that it will resonate with many regardless of where they live, whether in our province or in our country,” stated Mark Angelo.

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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: Asset Management for Sustainable Service Delivery in the District of Oak Bay” – released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in January 2022


“We have already started ramping up how much maintenance work we are doing, how much capital rehabilitation, and so on. The growth is going to continue. We are lucky that the community is asking for this. Now we are responding. It is a great situation. In some cases, we are being asked, Can you do this faster? In a lot of communities, it is a struggle because staff has a difficult time getting Council attention. In Oak Bay, we are fortunate to have folks who care about infrastructure and renewal. We can talk about it frankly. Things aren’t perfect but we are able to make progress…which is key,” stated Dan Horan.

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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: Blue Ecology is the Pathway to Reach Water Reconciliation” – released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in January 2022


“Our children’s children will be faced with daunting, complex, and urgent environmental problems. We owe them hope. Curiosity about other cultures draws us into a better understanding, and allows us to contrast and compare two worlds. The product of curiosity is an analysis whereby comparison and contrast enable the interweaving process. This is about creating a new form of knowledge through collaboration by interweaving useful threads from each way of knowing into a more robust way,” stated Michael Blackstock.

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DOWNLOAD A COPY OF: “Living Water Smart in British Columbia: Restore Hydrology in the Uplands to Protect Agriculture in the Lowlands” – released by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in January 2022


“Although reference continues to be made in engineering reports to the ARDSA drainage criteria, there is an absence of recognition of the underlying cost-benefit rationale for the criteria. I believe this reflects a loss of understanding that could have potentially serious implications for current and future decision-making. In recent years, for example, there have been instances of the criteria not being correctly presented in various engineering reports on lowland drainage, with misleading descriptor words such as ‘should’ creeping into reports,” stated Ted van der Gulik.

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