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Partnership for Water Sustainability Annual Workshop Series

Feast AND Famine Workshop: Will there be sufficient fresh water in the Lower Fraser River for agriculture in the future?


“Climate models predict warmer, longer, and drier summers. This means that farms within the Lower Fraser River will require more irrigation water in the future. Local sea level is predicted to rise and may contribute to an increasing quantity of salt water pushing up the river. In addition, changes to river hydrology may occur due to the removal of the George Massey Tunnel, possibly further increasing salinity levels,” states John ter Borg.

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Feast AND Famine Workshop: Moving Towards a Water Balance Culture in the Cowichan Region


“Recurring region-wide consequences of water-related challenges have also prompted regional action to develop governance structures and processes to make the connections between high-level decision making and actions on the ground. The Regional Surface and Ground Water Management and Governance Study identified co-governance with First Nations as a primary condition for success in managing regional water resources,” stated Keith Lawrence.

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UBCM session on “Tools, Resources & Funding for Local Governments” informed BC elected representatives about the upcoming ‘Feast AND Famine Workshop’ (December 1 in Richmond)


“The workshop is about solutions and tools that are being developed in BC in response to a changing climate. Through collaboration, the Partnership mission is to support and enable practitioners and decision makers so that they can take action at a local level. The ultimate goal is to redistribute the annual water balance by protecting and/or restoring the three pathways by which rainfall reaches streams,” Peter Law explained to local government elected representatives.

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Feast AND Famine Workshop: Partnership for Water Sustainability and IIABC announce that author Bob Sandford will speak to “Hydro-Climatic Change & Its Consequences”


The ‘new normal’ in British Columbia is floods and droughts. What is changing is how and when water arrives. “After a period of relative hydro-climatic stability, changes in the composition of the Earth’s atmosphere have resulted in the acceleration of the global hydrologic cycle with huge implications for every region of the world and every sector of the global economy,” states Bob Sandford.

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Build Water Resilient Communities: Partners release program overview for “Feast AND Famine Workshop” (December 1, 2015)


“The ‘new normal’ in British Columbia is drought and flooding. The summer dry season has extended on both ends and we can no longer count on a predictable snowpack and reliable rain to maintain a healthy water balance in our watersheds. Hence, this workshop on responding to a changing climate is about solutions and tools that are being developed in BC through collaboration to support practitioners and decision makers to take action at a local level,” states Mike Tanner.

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REGISTER NOW for a workshop on “Feast AND Famine! – Solutions and Tools in Response to a Changing Climate in BC” (December 1, 2015 in Richmond)


The workshop will showcase solutions and demonstrate tools that can help communities achieve a vision for water resiliency. “The Irrigation Industry Association and the Partnership for Water Sustainability are again partnering to co-host and jointly organize a workshop. This is the third consecutive year that our organizations have collaborated. The relationship has worked well. The IIABC and Partnership perspectives complement each other nicely,” states Karen van der Gulik.

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“Get Your Mind Into the Gutter Workshop provides an incentive to attend our AGM,” says Tim Pringle, President of the Partnership for Water Sustainability


“During the AGM, we will also be celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Water Sustainability Action Plan for BC. The Partnership is helping the Province of British Columbia to implement the Living Water Smart and Green Communities initiatives. This is done through a shared responsibility in delivering the Action Plan,” states Tim Pringle.

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