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2010 “From Rain to Resource” Workshop on Rainwater Management

OKANAGAN RAIN TO RESOURCE WORKSHOP: East Clayton ‘Green’ Development in Surrey established BC precedent for implementation of ‘Low Impact Development’ techniques and facilities


Looking back, application of the water balance methodology to East Clayton can now be seen as the genesis for the Stream Health Methodology that is embedded in the Water Balance Model powered by QUALHYMO. “With hindsight, the significance of East Clayton is two-fold. It was an early application of performance targets at a neighbourhood scale. Also, and most importantly the analysis combined mass balance and flow duration to test the achievability of performance targets,” stated Jim Dumont.

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OKANAGAN RAIN TO RESOURCE WORKSHOP: District of North Vancouver experience in applying the Water Balance Model to develop a watershed restoration vision – Richard Boase


“We saw the Water Balance Model as an important tool that would help us to work within our developed community to restore function and value based on the premise that developed land can contribute to watershed restoration. “Using the Mackay Creek Watershed as a case study, we have demonstrated to Council that the importance of hydrologic function associated with lands removed from the stream corridors is not only being overlooked but is contributing to the erosion of stream health,” stated Richard Boase.

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Bigger Pipes or Greener Communities: A Hydrological Assessment of using Low Impact Development to Mitigate Future Flooding


“Climate change significantly raises the risk of rain-generated floods and infrastructure failure. To maintain current levels of service, drainage infrastructure will need to be modified and upgraded,” stated Chris Jensen. “The research will help determine whether LID offers a viable solution for adapting to climate change, both within the unique case study area and potentially, in similar rainfall-dominated, urbanized watersheds.”

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Rollout of ‘Beyond the Guidebook 2010’ will continue at the ‘From Rain to Resource Workshop’ in Kelowna


“A decade ago, British Columbia made a conscious decision to follow an educational rather than prescriptive path to change the way that land is developed and water is used. The Province has provided a ‘design with nature’ policy framework that enables local governments to build and/or rebuild communities in balance with ecology,” stated Ted van der Gulik.

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OKANAGAN RAIN TO RESOURCE WORKSHOP: “Topsoil Primer Set” connects the dots between rainwater management and drought management (October 2010)


“A policy and legal tool called the 'Shared Responsibility Matrix' identifies the actors along with the various instruments that govern their actions. This provides the frame of reference for the Topsoil Primer Set,” explained Deborah Carlson. ‘Focusing on a single type of project—in this case, ‘topsoil requirements’ – can make it easier to map out the actors involved and the various decisions, actions and regulatory tools required and available to make the project a reality.”

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OKANAGAN RAIN TO RESOURCE WORKSHOP: Home Depot Demonstrates Rainwater Management Innovation in the City of Courtenay (October 2010)


“The dramatic change in site characteristics meant rainwater runoff had to be captured to maintain a before development hydrologic regime, if the project was to avoid downstream impacts,” stated Kevin Lagan. “Home Depot established a BC precedent when it implemented a deep deep-well system for injecting rainwater runoff and recharging the underlying groundwater aquifer.”

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FROM RAIN TO RESOURCE: Brock Dolman of the California-based WATER Institute will be keynote speaker at Okanagan Rainwater Workshop (October 2010)


“The WATER Institute promotes understanding of the importance of healthy watersheds to healthy communities. It is emphasizes that land-use management strategies must thoroughly analyze the impact of human activities on the hydrologic cycle, and how these activities affect species, community and ecosystem dynamics,” explains Brock Dolman. Asserting that it is “better to be safe than thirsty,” the WATER Institute advocates the use of the Precautionary Principle in decisions about water-use policy.

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BEYOND THE GUIDEBOOK 2010: Okanagan Rainwater Workshop provides forum for ‘convening for action’ to advance a new culture for watershed protection and restoration


“There is now clear guidance in BC for aligning local actions with provincial and regional goals to ‘design with nature’; so that we can create greener communities, live water smart and prepare for climate change. BC is now at a tipping point. Implementation of a new culture for urban watershed protection and restoration is within our grasp. Beyond the Guidebook 2010 sets the stage for settlement change that is in balance with ecology,” stated Kim Stephens.

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Water Bucket provides ‘home’ for telling the story of the Okanagan Rainwater Workshop


“The Okanagan Rainwater Workshop is important. It was one of three regional events that served as high-profile platforms for rollout of Beyond the Guidebook 2010: Implementing a New Culture for Urban Watershed Protection and Restoration in British Columbia,” stated Mike Tanner. “As the series unfolds, Water Bucket stories will be placing particular emphasis on those members of the ‘convening for action team’ who are contributing program content at the Okanagan Rainwater Workshop.”

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