Category:

2004 thru 2010

How does a community weigh the benefits and liabilities of change driven by demand for land use?


The key principle is that settlement and ecology are equal values and they must be as much in balance as possible for wellbeing of human and natural systems. “If we were in fact measuring ecological values, there would be more ‘weights’ (reliable data) on the ecology side of the balance scale; thus leading to more informed conclusions and hence different decisions,” stated Tim Pringle.

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Influencing Actions on the Ground in British Columbia


“The mandate of the Ministry of Community Development is to foster partnerships, collaboration, innovation and integration through the program elements that comprise the Green Communities Project. The goal is to build
capacity that will result in sustainable, healthy and vibrant communities,” stated Karen Rothe.

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Green Infrastructure Partnership publishes Commentary on Effective Municipal Rainwater/Stormwater Management that Achieves Watershed Health


“We have emphasized the connections surrounding ‘why we do it’ – watershed health and all that entails (quantity and quality) and the need for drainage actions to be integrated with all of the other policy and actions, to truly be effective – that is, thinking and integrating regionally down to the site scale”, stated Susan Rutherford.

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“The Story of the 2008 Vancouver Island Learning Lunch Seminar Series” – pilot for aligning local actions and provincial goals


“We wanted to explore a collaborative approach that we believed would help local governments make informed land development decisions that meet multiple objectives. The idea was an outcome of the Green Infrastructure Leadership Forum that CAVI and the Association of Vancouver Island Coastal Communities co-hosted in December 2007,” stated John Finnie.

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Water – Choosing Sustainability for Life and Livelihoods


“The Guide will fill a gap because what has been lacking is this – written information on green infrastructure that is written from the perspective of elected officials for elected officials. Before we can write a Communication Guide, we need to understand what elected officials already know plus what they would like to know about green infrastructure. Only then can we judge what level of information transfer will be useful to them,” stated Paul Ham.

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Waterscape Poster tells the story of the Okanagan Basin land and water resources


“Poster content is developed by water experts for specific communities in close collaboration with community representatives and educators through an iterative process of face-to-face discussion and focus groups. As a result, Waterscape posters reflect water issues that are most relevant to the local community, and have a sound scientific and technical underpinning,” stated Bob Turner.

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Convening for Action Launched at Okanagan Conference


“The 3-day Okanagan Conference organized by the Canadian Water Resources Association in February 2005 was the kick-off event for a sustained education process that is designed to broaden the province-wide base for this shared vision: In a fully integrated landscape, water is the unifying element,” stated Ron Smith.

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Province and BCWWA Committee jointly develop “Water Sustainability Action Plan for British Columbia”


“The drought, forest fires and floods that British Columbia experienced in 2003 have created a teachable moment for change in the way we view water in this province. Capitalizing on this opportunity, the purpose of the Water Sustainability Action Plan for British Columbia is to promote and facilitate sustainable approaches to water use and water resource management,” states Ray Fung.

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