Archive:

2010

Metro Vancouver Reference Panel informs Finance Committee deliberations on HOW to pay for two replacement sewage treatment plants


The Lions Gate and Iona Island treatment plants have each been in service for approximately 50 years. Both have exceeded their useful lives. Both are high risk facilities with attendant environmental and legal risks for Metro Vancouver. “The overall impact of constructing both treatment plants by 2020 is comparatively small. The incremental difference in the annual financing cost of one versus two plants is not that much. The biggest hit is the first one,” stated Mayor Malcolm Brodie of Richmond.

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BC Hydro Power Smart initiates ‘A Conservation Dialogue – Creating a Community of Practice’


“BC Hydro Power Smart recognizes the need for collaboration among organizations and individuals within the province,” emphasized Jeff Chiu, Manager, Community Network of Power Smart Specialists, in his remarks to the group. “As such, we have coordinated efforts with the Climate Action Secretariat’s office to build this provincial community network that can and will support regional based activities.”

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100-YEAR ACTION PLAN FOR BOWKER CREEK WATERSHED RESTORATION: Bowker Creek Forum advances a ‘regional team approach’ to achieving water sustainability in the Georgia Basin


Located in the urbanized heartland of the Capital Regional District, the Bowker Creek watershed is shared by the City of Victoria, City of Oak Bay, and District of Saanich. “A desired outcome in holding the Bowker Creek Forum was to share information about successful approaches, so that they can be replicated in other jurisdictions. The forum was a chance for regional organizations, businesses and community members to learn more about and celebrate the accomplishments of the Bowker Creek Initiative,” stated Tanis Gower.

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SYMPOSIUM ON PLANNING FOR RESILIENCE: “Collaborate and ‘design with nature’ to adapt to climate change,” urged Kim Stephens in a panel presentation on ‘Uncertain Water Supplies’ at the University of British Columbia (March 2010)


The School of Community and Regional Planning at UBC (SCARP) held its 2nd Annual Symposium in March 2010. The theme was Planning for Resilience. In his presentation, Kim Stephens responded to these questions: What potential crises is British Columbia facing presently or in the future regarding water? What is the state of current Provincial policies? What changes are needed and what lessons can we learn from other areas facing similar challenges?

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BOWKER CREEK BLUEPRINT: Water Bucket stories profile precedent-setting initiative for urban watershed restoration in the Georgia Basin


“Change is slow in the urban environment. It usually happens with re-development of individual lots as buildings wear out or as population density increases. With re-development comes opportunity for creek restoration or creek day-lighting,” writes Tanis Gower. “The Bowker Creek Initiative has produced a plan – the Bowker Creek Blueprint – that includes policy recommendations. Creek restoration opportunities typically arise with little warning, and the detailed plan and long-term vision will help all its partners be ready.”

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ARTICLE: Pathway to Urban Water Sustainability in British Columbia: Partnerships, Collaboration, Innovation and Integration (Environmental Science & Engineering Magazine, January 2010)


“A ‘regional team approach’ is founded on partnerships and collaboration, and seeks to align local actions with provincial and regional goals. Vancouver Island is demonstrating the regional team approach. It is revealing that inserting the word team could have such a profound impact on how practitioners view their world. Inclusion of the team word implies there is personal commitment – that is why the regional team approach is fundamentally different than a regional approach,” states Tim Pringle.

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Water – Choosing Sustainability for Life and Livelihoods


“How to accommodate a doubling of the population in the high growth regions of British Columbia is the driver for implementing changes in the way we develop land and use water,” stated Kim Stephens. “Conversations with elected representatives have yielded insights that have shaped implementation of Convening for Action pilot programs.”

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