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Water Use & Conservation

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Scientists are trying to figure out how rising temps will change the alpine run-off that helps power the province


Scientists like UBC’s Dan Moore know that glaciers are melting as the climate warms; that much is clear. They also know that climate change will change the movement and distribution of water in glacial-fed areas, which is most of British Columbia. Because of this, glaciers play a significant role in keeping the province’s hydroelectric system running. In a stable climate, glaciers “recharge” each winter when they accumulate more snow and ice.

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Reflections on the 2015 Drought: “Southwest British Columbia dodged a bullet,” stated Kim Stephens in an interview published by The Province newspaper


On a positive note, Kim Stephens said the water issue is gaining a prominence in the public’s mind which it has never had. “People in general have not appreciated how vulnerable we’ve always been. They’re beginning to see how essential it is,” he said. Stephens advises the public to stay positive and not succumb to a negative state of mind. “Drought is not the end of the world. Australia survived a seven-year drought. People get through it,” he said.

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Rainwater harvesting could save Australia billions, according to Rainwater Harvesting Association


Implementing water efficiency measures in planning policy could help save Australia billions of dollars, improve water resilience and help reduce the emissions of housing stock. According to Dr Peter Coombes, most states are aware of the findings, but are not motivated to implement such a scheme. “No one analyses the whole system together; it’s partial accounting,” he said.

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2015 Drought: Metro Vancouver water use restrictions lifted as of October 15


Greg Moore, Chair of the Metro Vancouver Regional Board said that Metro Vancouver will be reviewing what went right and wrong during the water restrictions this summer. Moore said one of the issues they will be reviewing is why there was no real change in water consumption when Metro want from Stage 1 to Stage 2 water restrictions earlier this summer, one of the factors that led to the Stage 3 restrictions.

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Partnership for Water Sustainability in BC organized “2015 Feast AND Famine Workshop” (Flood and Drought! What Happened to the Balance?)


The ‘new normal’ in British Columbia is floods and droughts. What is changing is how and when water arrives. “After a period of relative hydro-climatic stability, changes in the composition of the Earth’s atmosphere have resulted in the acceleration of the global hydrologic cycle with huge implications for every region of the world and every sector of the global economy,” states Bob Sandford.

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Drought Response in British Columbia: Province reminds local governments about BC’s Water Conservation Guide


“The Province is urging water users to take action to conserve and manage water according to the drought levels in their regions. The Guide helps communities in the development or revision of water conservation plans. Using the guide will also help ensure a community’s water conservation plan meets the requirements to be eligible for drinking water infrastructure funding from the Province,” wrote Liam Edwards.

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Drought Response in Metro Vancouver: Region ‘unlikely’ to move to Stage 4 water restrictions, says Mayor Darrell Mussatto


“Because we’ve been making adjustments and we’ve been reducing our water consumption, not watering our lawns or washing our cars and such, and using less water at home, it looks like hopefully we’ll be able to avoid the Stage 4 restrictions,” said Mayor Darrell Mussatto, Metro Vancouver Utilities Committee chair. “But indeed, we have to stay strong and continue to respect Stage 3, and that will happen probably right through until the end of September.”

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Drought Response in the Okanagan: Summerland Encourages Water Conservation


Although Summerland’s reservoirs were not in distress, the District took proactive measures in late August to ensure the community’s water supply is not depleted. “We want residents and businesses to understand the seriousness of the water situation in the Okanagan. Everyone needs to work together to do their part and make a conscious effort to voluntarily reduce their water consumption,” said Mayor Peter Waterman.

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Drought Response in Metro Vancouver: goal of BC Restaurant Association is to reduce water use by up to 15%


Ian Tostenson is urging his membership to take a leadership role in the fight to conserve water in Metro Vancouver. “They want to do the right thing. The public expects us to be doing it. And in a way, it’s good for business, because people like to support businesses that show a community-minded side. I think it’s a good message to see our industry taking these steps,” he said.

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Canadians Rank Among World’s Top Water Hogs


While public education and water restrictions help to conserve water, dramatic reductions can be achieved through water pricing. The City of Nanaimo employs water pricing that places the entire cost of water delivery on users without any subsidy from property tax. “That has had a huge impact. As (capital) costs have gone up, we’ve turned the water rates up and people have responded by turning their hoses off,” reported Bill Sims.

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