Premier Christy Clark announces that Ted van der Gulik inducted into British Columbia Public Service Hall of Excellence

The BC Public Service Hall of Excellence was established to recognize those individuals who have made exceptional and lasting contributions to the province of British Columbia. The inaugural induction of the Hall of Excellence took place at the provincial Premier’s Awards ceremony in Victoria on October 8, 2014. "For 10 years we have been recognizing and celebrating public service achievements that have made real differences in people’s lives. I wanted to find a special way to honour individuals who have made exceptional and lasting contributions to British Columbia. Now the Hall of Excellence is the highest form of recognition public service employees can strive for," stated Premier Christy Clark.

“Communities need to work harder on preventing ‘catastrophic’ failures that damage watersheds and become very costly for homeowners to mitigate,” says Tim Pringle

About 10.5%, or 13,055 homes constructed in the Capital Regional District prior to 1992, when natural gas became available, had oil heating installed. Failure of old oil heating systems, including unmaintained underground storage tanks (USTs), can lead to spills and costly clean up. “Adequate and consistent inventory would make it possible to systematically locate underground storage tanks and work with property owners to have them removed," stated Tim Pringle.

District of North Vancouver’s “GEOweb Open Data portal” empowers citizens through information

“Understanding the context is key to interpreting results. An increasing building footprint is short-circuiting the Water Balance, and this has consequences for local governments – both in terms of financial liability and fisheries sustainability. The District’s GEOweb open data portal are being used as communication and teaching tools. With GEOweb, and through the use of historical air photos and Google Street View, we can visually look back in time to clarify where we want to go. The take-away message is that the District of North Vancouver is leveraging technology to help us make better decisions and provide better service," states Richard Boase.

“In the City of Surrey, an absorbent landscape that slows, sinks and spreads rainwater is becoming a requirement for new development,” states David Hislop, Upland Drainage Engineer

“Soil depth is a primary water management tool for use by local government to adapt to a changing climate. A well-designed landscape with healthy topsoil helps communities through both wet and dry times. Soil is a sponge. It holds and slowly releases rainwater. This can limit runoff during rainy weather; and reduce irrigation water need during dry weather,” states David Hislop, Upland Drainage Engineer with the City of Surrey. “In the City of Surrey, an absorbent landscape that slows, sinks and spreads rainwater is becoming a requirement for new development. We specify a minimum soil depth of 300mm. The City’s implementation experience informed development of the Topsoil Bylaws Toolkit, funded by the Province and released in 2012."