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Water-Centric Planning Community-of-Interest

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"Water-centric planning means planning with a view to water – whether for a single site or the entire province. At the core of the approach is a water balance way-of-thinking and acting. The underpinning premise is that resource, land use and community design decisions will be made with an eye towards their potential impact on the watershed," explains Kim Stephens.

Leading by Example in BC: Water Smart Ambassador Program in the Columbia Basin region

“The lessons learned by Basin communities are relevant to any community trying to reduce peak demand driven by irrigation. To measurably reduce irrigation demand through residential water conservation outreach, you need a strong tool kit that includes good data and great personalities who are meeting people right at their homes and places of work,” said Neal Klassen.

Climate Change and Adaptation: The Engineering Reality


"And in the face of international scientific consensus on the reality and risks of climate change and global warming, Canada’s engineers have decided it’s time deal with the impacts, which are already being felt in many regions of the country," wrote Richard L. Rogers

How can smart planning help cities adapt to climate change?

“The Value of Green Infrastructure for Urban Climate Adaptation is intended as a resource for planners and decision makers at all levels of government. The innovative examples we review indicate that green infrastructure investments can provide a cost-effective way to enhance community resilience and prosperity," said Steve Winkelman.

BC’s Water Sustainability Act – Water Leaders identify two critical issues essential to the success of implementation

Passed into law in May 2014, the associated regulations are now being developed. In October 2014, a diversity of individuals working on issues related to water sustainability came together at a workshop held at the University of Victoria. “This group of water leaders developed a statement of support to the province which identified action was required on two critical issues to insure success of the Water Sustainability Act,” reports John Finnie.

Planning For Rain in California: Why Storm Water Management Matters during the Drought

"When much of California is facing drought and limited water supplies, capturing and reusing every drop of water will not only be clever, but crucial. By moving water away from the people and places that need it, stormwater cannot percolate into the ground and replenish water we keep drilling deeper and deeper to reach. Californians can counteract the negative impacts of stormwater runoff by promoting water infiltration at our houses or businesses," wrote Paula Luu.

“Canadians are helping to drink California dry,” says Don Cayo

"The University of California’s Agricultural Issues Centre in Davis has compiled figures that allow some back-of-the-envelope calculations of how much water has been absorbed and is retained by fruits and vegetables that cross the international border in a year," wrote Don Cayo.

Okanagan Basin Waterscape: Water – the myth of abundance

"We live in a dry landscape. The large lakes make water look abundant, but nature's yearly resupply is small. As our population is growing rapidly, so is our demand for water. Climate is changing and future water supplies are uncertain. Will there be enough water for our children and grandchildren? To meet the needs of humans and nature, we will have to rethink our water use, and value it more highly," stated Ted van der Gulik.