Latest News

Water-Centric Planning Community-of-Interest

Featured

"Water-centric planning means planning with a view to water – whether for a single site or the entire province. At the core of the approach is a water balance way-of-thinking and acting. The underpinning premise is that resource, land use and community design decisions will be made with an eye towards their potential impact on the watershed," explains Kim Stephens.

Leading Change in BC: Environmental Protection and the Built Environment – Develop with Care 2014

“When we first conceived of creating a document which would collate all aspects of environmental issues around urban/rural land development, we had no inkling that the document would be recognized world-wide, nor that it would be embraced so thoroughly by so many different disciplines,” states Marlene Caskey. Now retired from government, she was the project lead for both the original 2006 and 2012 update versions.

“Canadian Water Summit 2015” will be held in Vancouver (June 25, 2015)

"The world is more complex and fragile than ever before. These trends are bigger than any one organization can solve,” says Todd Latham. “The Energy of Water theme for the 2015 Canadian Water Summit is more than the water/energy nexus conversation – it’s about water professionals celebrating the positives and opportunity that water can bring to Canada."

Protection of Wetlands: “Engineers and biologists approach problems using very different methods,” observed Jim Dumont at Vancouver Island workshop

"Engineers approach design using very specific methods which have been established to provide a uniform result for a wide range of projects. Biologists approach a problem by first defining the goals and objectives before establishing the methods to be used," stated Jim Dumont. "We need to create a common understanding that can be shared between the professions to achieve more consistent success on projects."

Leading by Example in BC: Water Smart Ambassador Program in the Columbia Basin region

“The lessons learned by Basin communities are relevant to any community trying to reduce peak demand driven by irrigation. To measurably reduce irrigation demand through residential water conservation outreach, you need a strong tool kit that includes good data and great personalities who are meeting people right at their homes and places of work,” said Neal Klassen.

Climate Change and Adaptation: The Engineering Reality


"And in the face of international scientific consensus on the reality and risks of climate change and global warming, Canada’s engineers have decided it’s time deal with the impacts, which are already being felt in many regions of the country," wrote Richard L. Rogers

How can smart planning help cities adapt to climate change?

“The Value of Green Infrastructure for Urban Climate Adaptation is intended as a resource for planners and decision makers at all levels of government. The innovative examples we review indicate that green infrastructure investments can provide a cost-effective way to enhance community resilience and prosperity," said Steve Winkelman.

BC’s Water Sustainability Act – Water Leaders identify two critical issues essential to the success of implementation

Passed into law in May 2014, the associated regulations are now being developed. In October 2014, a diversity of individuals working on issues related to water sustainability came together at a workshop held at the University of Victoria. “This group of water leaders developed a statement of support to the province which identified action was required on two critical issues to insure success of the Water Sustainability Act,” reports John Finnie.

Planning For Rain in California: Why Storm Water Management Matters during the Drought

"When much of California is facing drought and limited water supplies, capturing and reusing every drop of water will not only be clever, but crucial. By moving water away from the people and places that need it, stormwater cannot percolate into the ground and replenish water we keep drilling deeper and deeper to reach. Californians can counteract the negative impacts of stormwater runoff by promoting water infiltration at our houses or businesses," wrote Paula Luu.