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Water-Centric Planning Community-of-Interest

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"Water-centric planning means planning with a view to water – whether for a single site or the entire province. At the core of the approach is a water balance way-of-thinking and acting. The underpinning premise is that resource, land use and community design decisions will be made with an eye towards their potential impact on the watershed," explains Kim Stephens.

Maude Barlow: Boiling Mad Over Canada’s Water Woes

Maude Barlow has chosen to focus on Canada’s looming water crisis in her latest book, Boiling Point. While her main focus is on national problems, there is, much that specifically concerns British Columbia. The belief that Canada has an abundance of water is dangerously misleading, she writes. “We face serious issues of water contamination … overextraction, glacial melt, and climate change."

Coquitlam River Watershed Roundtable: Building Resilience and Capacity for Inter-Jurisdictional, Watershed-Based Approaches

“Planning for capacity is proving especially important as the Roundtable looks forward to implementation of its Lower Coquitlam River Watershed plan over the coming years. The logistics of actually implementing watershed-wide initiatives spanning multiple jurisdictions make for uncharted territory in this watershed, however the Roundtable looks forward to taking on this new challenge and building the capacity needed to effectively do so," states Marni Turek.

THE WELL-TEMPERED CITY: What Modern Science, Ancient Civilizations and Human Behavior Teach Us About the Future of Urban Life –written by Jonathan Rose, a leading thinker

“Jonathan Rose’s non-stop tour of the city—an in depth account of its history, theory, and practice—is exhilarating and complete, wherein compassion, Bach’s The Well-Tempered Clavier, and contemporary scientific thinking finally come to rest together. This is a hugely satisfying poem—rich in history, thought and deeply felt throughout," wrote Philip Glass in a book review.

‘The Partnership on Vancouver Island – Leadership in Water Sustainability’

"We need both immediate-term pragmatism and visionary dedication to sustainability if we are to preserve our capacity for positive and permanent regional vitality," observes author and visionary Eva Kras. "Vancouver Island has a huge possibility, and responsibility, to form a type of model that communities in Canada can look to for ideas, related especially to the concept of collaboration."

‘Water will drive most decision-making’ in BC’s future, says 2016 Land Champion award-winner

"Because we simply will have less water. There will be larger storm events in the winter, and dealing with flooding and infrastructure, and then there will be much less water in the summertime in most communities. So climate will accelerate the sense of water shortage. I think local governments are going to start assessing the water impacts of any land-use decision that they make," stated Deborah Curran.

NEWS RELEASE: Partnership for Water Sustainability urges British Columbia local governments to integrate “water balance solutions” into land use decisions

“Implementation of ‘whole systems’ thinking would include incorporating the benefits provided by nature into the delivery of local government services," stated Peter Law. “Community-based Environmental Stewardship has been an institution in BC for a generation. Today, community organizations partner with local governments to monitor and restore local watershed health. These groups provide thousands of volunteer hours to restore aquatic habitats," stated Peter Law.

OPINION: Climate change threatens survival of Cowichan River, says David Anderson, former federal Minister of Enironment

"The Cowichan River Basin is in its third consecutive year of drought and in its eighth drought year since 1998." wrote David Anderson. "The river is the lifeblood of the Cowichan Valley. Its salmon runs have sustained the Cowichan First Nations since time immemorial. It supports both commercial and sport fisheries, and replenishes the aquifer that provides water for local agriculture and thousands of residents. The river also provides water for the local pulp mill."

NEW REPORT BY POLIS: Top 5 Water Challenges that will Define British Columbia’s Future

“When you take stock of all the examples of water issues emerging across BC’s watersheds, it amounts to a daunting array of complex problems,” says report co-author Rosie Simms. “These challenges also a present a genuine opportunity to collaborate on solutions, including full implementation of the province’s recent Water Sustainability Act through development of robust supporting regulations.”

OP-ED: “Protect our most precious resource, or we’re all dead in the water,” say Oliver Brandes and Rosie Simms

"The ominous threat of a water crisis looms even here in British Columbia. The implications are monstrous ...B.C. is responding with its new provincial water law—the Water Sustainability Act ....but more is needed, especially when it comes to implementation. Let’s celebrate these initial positive steps, but also keep working to ensure a robust regime to protect life-sustaining freshwater flows."

OP-ED: “Water – the need for collective and context specific action” – reflections by Rylan Dobson

"Business-as-usual is now no longer possible with the crisis that is faced by our global water resources," wrote Rylan Dobson. "The actions that will secure our water future will be more locally driven. Referred to as either context-based or science-based sustainability, there is a greater need for the business community and watershed users to better understand their individual local boundaries and directly their actions in order to ensure they operate within these boundaries."