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    DOWNLOAD: “The Story of the 2008 Vancouver Island Learning Lunch Seminar Series” – demonstration applications in two regions pioneered a ‘regional team approach’ to aligning efforts to implement Living Water Smart, BC’s Water Plan


    Inter-departmental participation by all member local governments effectively meant closing front counters on three Fridays for most of the day so that planning, engineering, operations and building inspection staff could attend the Learning Lunch seminars. “Each session started at 11:00am and ended at 2:30pm,” stated Peter Nilsen. “This was the right length of time to maintain the interest and energy level of participants. Three and a half hours sounds like a lot of time, but it goes quickly; and we were just scratching the surface in terms of the material that we presented.”

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    LIVING WATER SMART ON VANCOUVER ISLAND: Cowichan Water Use Plan Unveiled for Cowichan Region


    “During many years, there has no longer been enough water to support the varied needs of fish, local residents, industry and other users. By 2050 critical snow pack is projected to decrease by 85%, reducing lake inflows in the spring and early summer. This will be compounded by a reduction in summer rainfall of 17%,” said Jon Lefebure, Cowichan Valley Regional District Board Chair. “Further, water storage to support continued flow in most years will not be possible in the future without additional storage and adjusted management regimes.”

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    CONVENING FOR ACTION ON VANCOUVER ISLAND: “Our group is like a sponge with all that we are absorbing and then releasing to others in our community,” says Lynne Smith, Chairperson, Saltair Water Advisory Committee


    “Within weeks of the formation of the committee being announced, I was introduced to the work of the Partnership for Water Sustainability, and so I attended their Feast ‘n Famine Symposium in December 2015. How I view water was transformed by the experience. I was energized,” stated Lynne Smith. “It became clear to me that there was more to ‘water’ than just making sure it arrives in our pipes; and this realization has since guided us as a community group. Water is not just about taxation, but rather the very essence that sustains our existence!”

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    Eco-Asset Action in the Comox Valley: A community prepares to unpave a parking lot and put up a paradise


    The excitement and energy generated by the 2017 Comox Valley Eco-Asset Symposium has helped to move forward the long-term vision for transforming a decommissioned sawmill site on the Courtenay River into a valuable habitat corridor that could also transform the city’s most troublesome flood liabilities into an eco-asset corridor for the whole community. “The Comox Valley is approaching a watershed moment in land restoration, and all of British Columbia can learn some important lessons here,” states Vanessa Scott.

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    YOUTUBE VIDEO: “We have created a Star Wars civilization, with Stone Age emotions, medieval institutions and godlike technology,” quoted Bob Sandford during the public lecture at the Nanaimo Water Stewardship Symposium (April 2018)


    “When those who wish to make the world a better place turn to big data and related breakthroughs in deeper communication in support of common understanding of issue such as water and water-related climate concerns, we find that we have arrived too late,’ stated Bob Sandford. “This space has already hijacked by the inevitable forces of power and greed. The public mind is already being heavily manipulated toward other ends. This is also why there has been a widespread resurgence of carefully orchestrated climate denial.”

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    YOUTUBE VIDEO: “Each of us has helped to make change and pave the way for more people to join in, and for more people to be asked for their input and to have something worth saying,” stated Zo Ann Morten, co-keynote speaker, when she reflected on the role stewardship groups can play to drive restorative development


    “The Streamkeepers Program brought about the ability for regular people to learn about their streams, and to use science-based protocols to map and monitor their local waterways. People took to the program like ducks to water. Soon groups were popping up across Pacific Region and the community was seeing first-hand the changes in their watershed. And they started to talk about it, to their neighbours, friends and family, and to governments at all levels. And because it was fun, more people joined,” stated Zo Ann Morten.

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    YOUTUBE VIDEO: “The RDN demonstrates commitment to watershed initiatives and water sustainability by delivering this service with a long-term reliable funding source,” stated Julie Pisani, Regional District of Nanaimo


    “Our program is called Drinking Water and Watershed Protection on purpose. Yes, it’s a long name but it captures the related elements of water that we work on in terms of education, science and policy,” emphasized Julie Pisani. “To get to restorative development, we need to restore (or establish) healthy working partnerships. These partnerships will provide the foundation for implementing and maintaining a more sustainable and restorative way of developing our land base, centered on water protection.”

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    NANAIMO WATER STEWARDSHIP SYMPOSIUM – ON YOUTUBE (April 11-12, 2018): “The vision for restorative development is an idea whose time has come – and a set of videos uploaded to YouTube provide a permanent record of this watershed moment,” stated John Finnie, Partnership for Water Sustainability in British Columbia


    “The movies are out! Videos taken at the symposium are now posted on YouTube,” announced John Finnie. “While we are not looking for an Oscar, we must say that the quality of video production is outstanding. Our videographer, Gary Prendergast, has done a fabulous job of blending audio with PowerPoint slides. The extra effort to record the day has resulted in a legacy resource that will give life to the Symposium as a ‘watershed moment’.”

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    Benefits of Inter-Regional Collaboration: “Peer-based learning is motivating and powerful,” stated Brian Carruthers, Chief Administrative Office, Cowichan Valley Regional District


    In April 2017, staff from the three mid-Vancouver Island regional districts met in Duncan. Their primary purpose in meeting was to inform and educate the Cowichan Valley Regional Board about a range of approaches to watershed management functions and watershed protection plans on Vancouver Island. “The Regional District of Nanaimo (RDN) and Comox Valley presentations to our Regional Board were of high quality and relevant,” stated Brian Carruthers. A year later, options for a potential establishment bylaw were presented to Board members.

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    Water Stewardship in a Changing Climate: Richard Boase brings an inter-regional perspective to his moderator role at the Nanaimo Water Symposium (April 12, 2018)


    Over the past decade, Richard Boase has been a key member of the Partnership for Water Sustainability team for training workshops and “sharing and learning” sessions in Metro Vancouver, Capital Region, Cowichan Valley, Comox Valley and Nanaimo Region. “The time has come to assertively push our politicians to make the hard decisions now for the benefit of our future generations; and to follow through with policy, regulations and bylaws that require simple, landscape-based, outcome-driven solutions so that we can start watershed restoration now,” said Richard Boase in 2010.

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