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LOOK AT DEVELOPMENT DIFFERENTLY: Comox Valley Eco-Asset Management Symposium – Discovering Nature’s Infrastructure Potential (on March 14-15, 2017)

“In community drinking watersheds, logging is accelerated as harvest rotations shorten. The reduced ability of forests to capture winter rain and slow snowmelt leads to increased spring runoff, resulting in more flooding and source drinking water quality issues,” states Tim Ennis. “If the long-term value of forest ecosystem services was taken into account when community development is planned, more forested areas would be retained to capture rainwater."

FLASHBACK TO 2009: “Living Water Smart is about motivating and inspiring everyone to embrace shared responsibility,” stated the Ministry of Environment’s Lynn Kriwoken at the 2009 Comox Valley Learning Lunch Seminar Series (Sept-Oct-Nov) on Getting Ahead of the Wave

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Provincial programs provide direction as to where the Province wants to go with Living Water Smart and the Green Communities Initiative. “While legislative reform is a foundation piece, collaboration takes place outside the legislative framework. At the end of the day, planners and engineers and other disciplines must come together to determine the issues and solutions. No statute will help them do that. Influencing behaviour and attitudes is at the heart of moving from awareness to action," stated Lynn Kriwoken.

FLASHBACK TO 2012: “Georgia Basin Inter-Regional Educational Initiative” launched at inter-regional Water Balance Forum hosted by Cowichan Valley Regional District (March 2012)

“The Water Balance Forum was the kick-off for an inter-regional education initiative to be implemented in four regions over several years. Sharing of experiences, collaboration, alignment and a consistent approach on Vancouver Island will allow everyone to go farther, more efficiently and effectively,” stated Kate Miller. “Our emphasis will be on “targets and criteria”, lessons learned, and practices necessary to protect stream health.”

Georgia Basin IREI: Okanagan audience introduced to drivers for “Sustainable Watershed Systems, through Asset Management” at FLOWnGROW Workshop (Nov 2016)

"The twin pillars of the IREI are the Water Balance Methodology and Ecological Accounting Protocol," stated Kim Stephens. "The Methodology links actions at the site scale with desired outcomes at a watershed scale. The new paradigm is that watersheds are infrastructure assets. Local governments would use the Ecological Accounting Protocol to develop a more complete financial picture. It is a method of ascertaining economic value of services drawn from natural assets."

Georgia Basin IREI: “Everyone learns about the water balance (water cycle) in elementary school, but most have forgotten by high school,” stated Kim Stephens in a lecture to landscape architect students at UBC (Nov 2016)

North Vancouver City is a case study for a UBC design course on integration of landscape architecture into urban rainwater management strategies. "The lecture by Kim Stephens was excellent and well-paced," stated Daniel Roehr, Associate Professor. "He provided clarity regarding a course objective, which is to design at different scales, using the reverse design strategy, site and details first before urban and regional scale."

Georgia Basin IREI: “The Ecological Accounting Protocol is the lynch-pin for achieving Sustainable Watershed Systems through a whole-system, water balance approach,” stated Kim Stephens at a meeting of Metro Vancouver’s Stormwater Interagency Liaison Group (Nov 2016)

"The emphasis in using the Ecological Accounting Protocol (EAP) would be on adaptive management design, rather than a prescriptive approach," stated Kim Stephens. "The essence of EAP is that 'Optimum Infrastructure Design = Watershed Health'. Optimum implies preserving hydrologic integrity plus achieving best opportunity-cost outcomes in the long-term. The watershed defines what goes into EAP."

Water Sustainability: “Convening for Action experience shows that success will follow when local governments embrace 10 guiding principles,” stated Kim Stephens during a lecture delivered in Parksville (Nov 2016)

"Kim Stephens was able to communicate concepts in a way that made sense to the class. They understood him perfectly," observed Todd Pugh, sessional instructor for Capilano’s Local Government Administration Certificate program. "It is such a mix of people – there were some who would have liked to hear more about the science behind what he presented, and for others it was more science than they’ve experienced since elementary school."

Georgia Basin IREI: “Local governments learn from each other and progress through sharing of case study experience,” stated Kim Stephens in his presentation to municipal engineers at the Annual APEGBC Conference (Oct 2016)

The Municipal Engineering Division invited Kim Stephens to make a presentation on Sustainable Watershed Systems at the 2016 APEGBC Annual Conference. "We then invited Kim Stephens to write an article for Innovation magazine that would help spread word about his presentation, as well as provide a sneak peek for conference attendees," states Monique Kieran. "The article serves as a proceedings article for the conference presentation.”

Implementation of Stormwater Utility in the City of Victoria: Moving Towards a Water-Resilient Future

The new billing system also allows people to reduce their stormwater bills by making improvements to their property to better manage water, Fraser Work said. Financial rewards will be offered to property owners who add rain gardens, cisterns, green roofs or resurface driveways with a permeable surface that absorbs stormwater. "When you are looking at potentially replacing your driveway, when you are looking at doing some roof work ... you can look at this rewards program as a source of cost mitigation."