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Convening for Action in 2008

FLASHBACK TO 2008: Ministry of Environment hosted a workshop on “Shared Stewardship of Our Water Resources: Now and in the Future”


“In 2007, the Ministry’s first ‘water workshop’ brought together over 120 individuals representing all levels of government and local stewardship groups for a day of talks and discussion,” stated John Deniseger. “In 2008, the focus shifted to ongoing, completed and proposed projects, studies and ideas around shared stewardship of the region’s water surface and groundwater resources. The workshop was aimed at planners at all levels of government, as well as stewardship groups involved in watershed planning.”

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FLASHBACK TO 2008: “Where and how land is developed determines how water is used, and how it runs off the land,” stated Kim Stephens at the Shared Stewardship of Our Water Resources Workshop


“Think about what it would mean to preserve the soil layer as a requirement of land development. It acts as a sponge. And what does it do? It means that gardens will use less water; and less water will runoff. We need to think simply in terms of the relationship between land and water, and the sustainability of both water supply and aquatic habitat,” stated Kim Stephens.

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FLASHBACK TO 2008: “There was a sense of urgency. We wanted to talk about and establish some way of collaborating on Vancouver Island,” stated Eric Bonham at the Shared Stewardship of Our Water Resources Workshop


“In A Sound County Almanac,” stated Eric Bonham, “Aldo Leopold wrote that we abuse the land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us. When we see the land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.” In Leopold’s vision of a land ethic, the relationships between people and land are intertwined: care for people cannot be separated from care for the land. A land ethic is a moral code of conduct that grows out of these interconnected caring relationships.

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FLASHBACK TO 2008: "A performance target approach to land development makes sense, can meet multiple objectives, and thereby result in net environmental benefits at a watershed scale," stated Kim Stephens at the concluding seminar in the Cowichan Valley Learning Lunch Seminar Series (July 2008)


“Once we went back to basics and developed the concept of a Rainfall Spectrum, this then led into the concept of Performance Targets for rainwater runoff capture. The reason runoff percentage is the performance target is that municipalities exert control over runoff volume through their land development and infrastructure policies, practices and actions,” explained Kim Stephens.

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A Vision for Vancouver Island: The Learning Lunch Series will inform implementation of "A Positive Settlement Strategy"

“The Series has exceeded our own expectations, Our initial objective was to facilitate a consistent understanding of core technical concepts. Because local governments enthusiastically embraced the opportunity to align local actions with over-arching provincial goals, the resulting success of the Series has enabled us to move beyond that limited objective. The energy to think like a region has been unleashed,” stated Kim Stephens.

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Real Estate Foundation hosts Green Developers Roundtable at 2008 Gaining Ground Summit

“The roundtable purpose was to initiate a dialogue with the development community. This consultation is an essential element of a two-track approach to encourage local governments and the development community to implement policies and practices that accommodate settlement growth and change without irrevocable damage to the ecology that underlies the well being of Island communities,” reported John Finnie.

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Showcasing Green Infrastructure Innovation on Vancouver Island: Summary Report on the 2008 Capital Region Series

“The goal in showcasing innovation and celebrating successes is to move ‘from awareness to action’ in doing business differently — through sharing of approaches, tools, experiences and lessons learned that will ultimately inform a pragmatic strategy for climate change adaptation,” states Eric Bonham, a founding member of the CAVI Leadership Team.

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Showcasing Green Infrastructure Innovation on Vancouver Island: The 2008 Capital Region Series

“Showcasing Innovation has helped local government practitioners immeasurably by creating forums for them to share their experiences and lessons learned. This has created a ripple effect that has spurred even more innovation. The 2008 Series can play an integrating role to cut across disciplines and ultimately help communities create neighbourhoods that integrate both good planning and innovative engineering designs,” stated Ray Fung.

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2008 Cowichan Water Balance Forum: “The success of the Forum is demonstrated by a number of results,” wrote Jay Bradley, Chair, Vancouver Island Coordinating Team


“In the larger context, the forum is indicative of how far along our community of Vancouver Island practitioners has come,” concludes Jay Bradley. “We are fostering a growing understanding of the fact that what goes on at a site, in terms of how rainwater is treated, is linked not only to stream and watershed health, but also to our social well-being and aesthetics of our communities.”

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