Author Archives: Partnership for Water Sustainability

  1. NANAIMO WATER SYMPOSIUM: Public Lecture by Bob Sandford on “Moving Towards Restorative Development – The Hard Work of Hope” (April 11, 2018 at the Coast Bastion Hotel)

    Comments Off on NANAIMO WATER SYMPOSIUM: Public Lecture by Bob Sandford on “Moving Towards Restorative Development – The Hard Work of Hope” (April 11, 2018 at the Coast Bastion Hotel)

    Note to Reader:

    Renowned author and speaker Bob Sandford, EPCOR Chair for Water & Climate Security at the United Nations University, will set the tone for the Nanaimo Water Symposium. At a public lecture on the evening of April 11, 2018 his inspirational message will be a call to action.

    The Hard Work of Hope, the latest book by Bob Sandford and co-author Jon O’Riordan, seeks to develop effective solutions to the growing urgency for global action on climate change. It builds on events that have transpired since the Paris Agreement in December 2015.

    The Hard Work of Hope was launched following a public talk on January 23, 2018 at the University of Victoria.

    To register for the public lecture in Nanaimo, visit https://www.civicinfo.bc.ca/event/2018/Nanaimo-Water-Symposium

    “We still have a chance to save our environment,”
    wrote Bob Sandford

    “A strongly entrenched narrative within our society that has pictured humanity as being somehow above global material and energy cycles, with no need to consider the finiteness of the Earth’s resources, has proven to be wrong and dangerous. As a society, we have to come back down to Earth,” wrote Bob Sandford in an opinion piece published in January 2018.

    “If a climate that’s warmer than what has existed on this planet for 15 million years is not enough to give us pause about the future, then surely the realization that human-induced impacts occurring in tandem with climate disruption — such as alterations of global nitrogen and phosphorous cycles, ocean acidification and synthetic chemical pollution — are clearly near tipping points that could push the Earth and conditions that support life on Earth into a new and unrecognizable state should be sobering to say the least.

    “The United Nations responded to the urgency and the opportunity of finally getting sustainable development right in September of 2015, just before the Paris climate talks. Their response was the announcement of a new framework for action in support of global sustainability.

    Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

    “While it did not receive the same attention in the media, the announcement of the UN’s 2030 Transforming Our World global sustainable-development agenda was at least as important as the later climate negotiations in Paris, if only because it deals with damage we are doing to other elements of the Earth system that are exacerbating and being exacerbated by climate change.

    “We at last have a universally understood and accepted definition for what sustainability really means and a common timetable for implementation of clear goals aimed at achieving measurable targets at both global and national levels.

    Five Themes:

    “The 2030 Transforming Our World agenda is constructed around five themes: people, planet, prosperity, peace and partnership. It is also important to note that this agenda applies equally to the developed world and developing nations. The agenda makes it clear that unless we all take common goals seriously and implement meaningful and measurable actions at the national and sub-national level in every country in the world, now, we will not achieve sustainability globally.

    “This means there can be no laggards, particularly in the developed world. It also means that the world cannot afford to leave anyone behind.

    “The 2030 Transforming Our World agenda promises to be the most comprehensive and inclusive effort to change the world positively in all of human history. It is nothing less than a charter for people and the planet for the 21st century.

    Towards Restorative Development:

    “The 2030 Transforming Our World agenda raises the ceiling on sustainability. The agenda makes it very clear that sustainable development can no longer simply aim for environmentally neutral solutions.

    “If we are to achieve any meaningful level of sustainability, all development has to be not only sustainable, but restorative. We can no longer simply aim to slow or stop damage to the Earth system; we have to restore declining Earth system function.

    “We face so many overlapping and intersecting crises we can no longer afford to fix them one at a time or in isolation of one another.

    “All future development must seek double, triple, if not quadruple benefits in terms of the restoration of fundamental Earth system function as reflected in biodiversity stability, efficient water use, soil vitality, carbon storage, and human and planetary health.

    Bill Reid – Black Canoe (image credit: By Boberger – self-made, Photographer: Bengt Oberger, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2551770)

    Our Society Floats on Water!

    “Canada, and British Columbia in particular, are in a good position to make sustainability possible. Though our society is powered by petroleum and lubricated by oil, it floats on water. Our society is a vessel in its own right. It is a lifeboat carrying us all over water toward the future.

    “It is impossible to think of a boat carrying societies into the future without thinking of artist Bill Reid’s famous Black Canoe, a replica of which is on prominent display at the Vancouver Airport. The Black Canoe is nothing less than a Haida ark; the complete physical reality and spiritual universe of an entire people in one boat, in which everyone and everything paddles together toward the future.

    “The Black Canoe is a magnificent metaphor for British Columbia. In addition to spectacular natural landscapes, British Columbia possesses remarkable Indigenous cultures.

    “Few places in the world are as rich in traditional and local knowledge and in possession of such a deep sense of place.

    “The opportunity still exists here for everyone to get into that “Black Canoe” and, along with all the animals and the rest of creation, paddle together toward the great promise of living in, and sharing with others, a province that was once deemed — with some justification — the Best Place on Earth.” concluded Bob Sandford.

  2. CONTEXT FOR NANAIMO WATER SYMPOSIUM: “The Hard Work of Hope – Climate Change in the Age of Trump” – a book by Bob Sanford and Jon O’Riordan

    Comments Off on CONTEXT FOR NANAIMO WATER SYMPOSIUM: “The Hard Work of Hope – Climate Change in the Age of Trump” – a book by Bob Sanford and Jon O’Riordan

    Note to Reader:

    The Climate Nexus (Rocky Mountain Books, 2015) analyzed and explored the economic and social realities facing water, food, energy and biodiversity. The Hard Work of Hope continues this narrative and seeks to develop effective solutions to the growing urgency for global action on climate change.

    Again co-authored by Bob Sandford and Jon O’Riordan, The Hard Work of Hope builds on events that have transpired since December 2015, including initial implementation of the UN’s 2030 Transforming our World global sustainable development agenda; the Paris Agreement on Climate Change; the commitment of the Canadian federal government to establish a climate action plan; and the UN Climate Summit in Marrakesh, Morocco, which aimed to advance the goals of the Paris Agreement.

    Bob Sandford is the EPCOR Chair for Water & Climate Security at the United Nations University. He will set the tone for the Nanaimo Water Symposium.  At a public lecture on the evening of April 11, 2018 his inspirational message will be a call to action.

    The Hard Work of Hope

    This latest RMB Manifesto emphasizes three themes: the growing urgency for global action regarding climate change; the fact that future development must not just avoid causing damage but strive to be ecologically and socially restorative; and the reality that effective solutions require changes to technology, restoration of biodiversity and increased public awareness.

    About the Authors:

    Bob Sandford is a renowned author and public speaker. He was the co-author of the UN Water in the World We Want report on post-2015 global sustainable development goals relating to water.

    Jon O’Riordan is a former Deputy Minister of the Ministry of Sustainable Resource Management in the British Columbia Provincial Government. He is an Adjunct Professor with the School of Community ad Regional Planning at UBC and Research Director with the Climate Adaptation Team centred at Simon Fraser University.

    Our Climate is Changing

    “Though contemporary politics and the state of the environment seem grim in this ‘post-truth world’, there will always be hope. But that hope will require hard work by everyone if our planet is to remain a desirable place to live in a warming world,” write Bob Sandford and Jon O’Riordan.

    “Changes in the composition of the Earth’s atmosphere are causing water to move more energetically through the global hydrological cycle, making the world’s water crises even more urgent to address. Until we lost the relative stability of the planetary water cycle, we had no idea how much we relied on that stability.”

    “Water is at the very centre of human existence, part of an intimately interwoven nexus that links the amount of water we need to sustain human life, to how much of it we take from nature to grow our food, to the amount we need for generating energy, to the increasing impact our burgeoning population is having on biodiversity worldwide.

    “What we are discovering is the extent to which the fundamental function of our political structures and global economy are predicated on relative hydrologic predictability, especially as it relates to precipitation patterns that define water security.

    “As a result of the loss of relative hydrologic stability, it is not just food production, energy use and biodiversity-based Earth system function that are disrupted. Political and economic stability is also at risk in a number of regions in the world.

    “We are only now beginning to understand how complex this issue has become. Hydro-climatic change has the potential to literally and fundamentally redraw the map of the world.”

    Global Water Crisis is Widespread

    “The global water crisis is more widespread than we think.

    “First Nations and other remote communities even in Canada have suffered needless water shortages or contamination.

    “Places here and abroad have been impacted disastrously by flooding of magnitudes never before witnessed. Droughts are occurring that are so deep and so prolonged that no one remembers such suffering ever happening before.

    “It is questionable whether some of these places will ever be habitable again. Ours is a world of distress and danger we can help alleviate and prevent. That is why it is important to consider how a disruption in the global order right now could affect our capacity to advance and export our expertise in the management of water to where it is needed.

    “That is why we should pay close attention to what is happening in the United States. So why be concerned? We should be concerned because we may be at a turning point in human history that will complicate our efforts to address the growing global crisis with respect to water security and climate stability.”

    Implications of US  Withdrawal from Paris Agreement

    “The new American president has stated that the US will withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement. The immediate risk is that what is happening in the US will slow the global momentum on climate action.

    “If this happens, President Trump may be condemning future generations of Americans and the rest of the world to hell on Earth. This profound threat to the future of humanity, however, has not been mentioned in mainstream coverage of the new political road the president began immediately to plow through the White House.

    “America’s potential failure to meet its obligations with respect to the Paris Agreement ought to be of concern not just to those who worry about climate or about water resources but to anyone who cares about the world order or even about order itself. If there is to be hope, then an improved order must somehow emerge out of what will hopefully be a temporary setback.

    Why We Should Be Concerned

    “So what have the climate and the global water cycle been doing while much of humanity was distracted by the geopolitical upheaval associated with the US election and the potential threat to the future of the European Union brought about by rising populism in Europe?

    “Scientists in the US and around the world officially declared 2016 the hottest year on record, the third such precedent-setting year in a row. Arctic warming is already 3.54°C above the global average, so holding that region to an increase of less than 2° per the Paris Agreement is already out of the question and has been so for a decade.

    “The concern among climate scientists is that in the absence of Arctic sea ice, and with oceans warming, we appear to be approaching the point where we have warmed the planet enough that the Earth itself and its cold oceans have begun to literally sweat out greenhouse gases.”

    “What these scientists are talking about is the very real potential for runaway climate feedbacks in our time. The problem is that there are a lot of hydrocarbons in the ground in the Arctic, and most are kept trapped there by an imperfect cap of frozen ground and permafrost.”

    What We Can Do in Canada

    “This could be the time to resolutely support and promote factual, intelligent, thoughtful and persistent dialogue as a hallmark of what Canada will stand for in this new epoch. And this is clearly a time when, for the sake of the future, we must uphold scientific principles and defend the scientific method in all matters related to water and climate change.

    “We need to support, report, communicate and celebrate the scientific research undertaken in Canada by government agencies and universities, and to share and showcase advances in leading-edge technology and practice in the private sector.

    “Most importantly, however, this is a time when we need to get our own water house in order, not just because of growing concerns over water in the United States but because our own future prosperity and place in the world will depend on how we deal with the accelerating changes of hydro-climatic regimes that will affect every part of this immense country.

    “By acknowledging and celebrating successes in making the world better – successes that have come about by cultivating collective memory of past social injustices and environmental problems and recognizing how far we have come in addressing many of those – we demonstrate how we are in fact already actively clarifying and realizing a vision of where and how we want to live in the Anthropocene.”

    Climate Change is Not a Hoax

    “Climate change is not a hoax. Though it is easy to wish otherwise, climate change is real and it is a threat to us all. But if we work together to manage water better, we can deal with that threat.

    “With this challenge before us, those who understand how food production, energy use and biodiversity-based Earth system function revolve around water and how water is related to climate are going to be very important to the future. Such is the hard work of hope in our time.

    “Although the transition of the global economy to achieve the 50–50–50 goals of the UN Paris Agreement is too slow and timid, there are some encouraging signs of progress.

    “Renewables are providing for a larger proportion of total energy use than ever before. Various jurisdictions have enacted some encouraging new legislation governing groundwater use and retaining ecological flows in streams.

    “More and more farmers are recognizing the value of restoring natural capital on their lands, and the degradation of terrestrial biomass has been slowed. However, these shifts are still insufficient to reduce total global carbon emissions or significantly increase carbon storage in the Earth’s ecosystems.

    “There needs to be more-fundamental change, which in the past has been brought about by new economic conditions resulting from the advent of ‘disruptive technologies’ those that transform whole markets by making existing technologies or products obsolete,” conclude the authors.

    The Role of Governments

    “There are four key actions that must be led by governments across the globe and be implemented by 2030 in order to start to turn the corner.

    “The first goal is to reduce the threat of water insecurity. Water lies at the heart of the nexus, yet it faces the most severe risks due to changing hydrology. The International Decade for Action “Water for Sustainable Development,” 2018–2028 must result in meaningful progress for ensuring safe access to sustainable water management and sanitation globally;

    • basic infrastructure – both engineered systems and using nature’s assets for managing the increased risk of flooding;
    • application of emerging smart technology for more efficient water use;
    • long-term drought management plans to deal with potential mega-droughts; and
    • a complete rethink of regulations for recovering resources from waste water treatment.

    “Canada’s current financial policies actually restrict integrated resource recovery from waste treatment.”

    The Role of Individuals

    “A top-down approach, by governments alone, cannot achieve the transition outlined in this book.

    “Indeed, the necessary effort can be successful only through the synchronization of government policy, with a network of energized and aware citizens operating through universities, businesses, governments and households that can influence and implement such policy from the bottom up.

    “This support requires an informed citizenry that understands the potential roles they can play in contributing to solutions and engages in deliberations on the transition.

    “In short, the public needs to become educated on how the nexus of water, energy, food and biodiversity functions, on the links to healthy ecosystems and how people can adapt their everyday decisions about consumption, travel and accommodation to reduce their individual and collective carbon footprint.”

     

  3. REGISTER HERE for Nanaimo Water Symposium on Watershed Stewardship in a Changing Environment (April 11-12, 2018)

    Comments Off on REGISTER HERE for Nanaimo Water Symposium on Watershed Stewardship in a Changing Environment (April 11-12, 2018)

    To Register:

    Visit https://www.civicinfo.bc.ca/event/2018/Nanaimo-Water-Symposium

    Atmospheric rivers are likely to cause greater flooding and related economic damage widely

    Convening for Action in the Nanaimo Region

    The warming of the planet’s atmosphere is causing water to move more quickly and disruptively through the global water cycle. Local consequences are magnified.

    To make the right choices moving forward, decision-makers at all levels and scales must understand how and where the rhythms of water are changing. After that, all of us must collaborate to adapt our land use and infrastructure servicing practices appropriately!

    Case for Restorative Development

    The gravity of the situation calls for a Whole-System, Water Balance Approach to watershed restoration in the built environment. Successful implementation would depend on all the players – in particular politicians, planners, landowners, designers and implementers – collectively choosing to embrace a ‘design with nature’ philosophical foundation.

    Local government collaboration with the stewardship sector is pivotal on this journey. Tapping into this resource would harness energy and potential to ‘get it right’ as communities develop and redevelop land.

    “On April 11-12, 2018, join us in Nanaimo for a symposium on watershed stewardship, the water balance and restorative development,” states Gail Adrienne, Executive Director, Nanaimo & Area Land Trust (NALT). “Adapting to climate change requires transformation in how we value nature and service land. An informed stewardship sector can be a catalyst for action. Learn what stewardship groups are already doing to make a difference!

    To Register:

    Visit https://www.civicinfo.bc.ca/event/2018/Nanaimo-Water-Symposium

     

     

     

     

  4. DOWNLOAD PROGRAM HERE for “Convening for Action in Nanaimo” at a 2-day water stewardship flagship event (April 11-12, 2018): Field Trip, Public Lecture & Symposium

    Comments Off on DOWNLOAD PROGRAM HERE for “Convening for Action in Nanaimo” at a 2-day water stewardship flagship event (April 11-12, 2018): Field Trip, Public Lecture & Symposium

    What Do You Wonder?

    The symposium is an outreach and professional development event, held under the umbrella of the Georgia Basin Inter-Regional Education Initiative, and is designed to foster a conversation in the Nanaimo Region about “Sustainable Watershed Systems, through Asset Management”.

    To Learn More:

    Download a copy of the latest version of the PROGRAM BROCHURE

    To register, visit https://www.civicinfo.bc.ca/event/2018/Nanaimo-Water-Symposium

    Field Trip to Buttertubs Marsh and 5-Acres Farm

    Join the City of Nanaimo and the Nature Trust of British Columbia on a tour of Buttertubs Marsh that will trace the history of this special place and the growing stewardship legacy developing here. Several projects and initiatives are currently underway, including a study on determining the financial value of the marsh as a community asset.

    The five-acre farm located in Harewood is the last farm of BC’s first agricultural community plan, an historic and innovative plan unique to Nanaimo. Today, this farm supports many values that are important to Nanaimo: historical, agricultural-food security, creative employment and environmental values.

    Public Lecture – “The Hard Work of Hope”

    Renowned author and speaker Bob Sandford, EPCOR Chair for Water & Climate Security at the United Nations University, will set the tone for the symposium.  At a public lecture on the evening of April 11, his inspirational message will be a call to action.

    The Hard Work of Hope, the latest book by Bob Sandford and co-author Jon O’Riordan, seeks to develop effective solutions to the growing urgency for global action on climate change. It builds on events that have transpired since the Paris Agreement in December 2015.

    Stewardship Context & Program Overview for Symposium on Day 2

    Context is important. In the 1990s, the first streamkeeper groups were formed in British Columbia. They had an immediate impact. They galvanized government into action.

    A landmark success story was the Urban Salmon Habitat Program. It forged relationships between local governments and stewardship groups. This helped to set in motion a provincial ‘whole-system, water balance’ journey that continues to this day.

    “Fast forward to the present. Anecdotal evidence suggests a groundswell of heightened awareness of the watershed context for “the creek that flows through my backyard”. Awareness is translating into involvement and empowerment to make a difference,” observes Derek Richmond, a Director of the Partnership for Water Sustainability in BC, and Past-Chair (2011-2016) of CAVI-Covening for Action on Vancouver Island.

     

  5. Restore Watershed Hydrology, Prevent Stream Erosion, Ensure Salmon Survival: Released in October 2017, the Shelly Creek Water Balance & Sediment Reduction Plan has established a provincial precedent for implementation of “water balance approach” to restoration of watershed health

    Comments Off on Restore Watershed Hydrology, Prevent Stream Erosion, Ensure Salmon Survival: Released in October 2017, the Shelly Creek Water Balance & Sediment Reduction Plan has established a provincial precedent for implementation of “water balance approach” to restoration of watershed health

    Note to Reader:

    In 1999 the Englishman River on the east coast of Vancouver Island was declared an endangered river. Extinction of the salmon resource was viewed as a very real possibility. This catalyst for action resulted in two transformational outcomes: implementation of the Englishman River Watershed Recovery Plan (2001); and creation of the Mid Vancouver Island Habitat Enhancement Society (MVIHES).

    Fast forward to the present. Shelly Creek, a tributary of the Englishman River that flows through the City of Parksville, is important to salmonids. MVIHES has established a provincial precedent with the Shelly Creek Water Balance & Sediment Reduction Plan; and this will have reverberations as the “Shelly Creek story” becomes well-known.

    The Shelly Creek experience foreshadows that an informed stream stewardship sector may prove to be a difference-maker that accelerates implementation of the ‘whole-system, water balance’ approach in British Columbia.

    DOWNLOAD A COPY

    Englishman River_location map

    MVIHES – Stewards of the Watershed

    Over the past two decades, the evolving role of stream steward groups in British Columbia is exemplified by Englishman River experience. In the1990s, the ‘Coho salmon crisis’ raised the alarm and galvanized action to tackle the impact of human activities on stream health and fish survival in urbanizing watersheds.

    Across Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland, salmon enhancement stewardship groups formed. Many volunteer groups had their beginnings in small stream salmon enhancement projects.

    Look Beyond the Creek Channel

    A generation later, most community-based groups still exist. They provide thousands of volunteer hours to restore aquatic habitats. From (salmon egg) incubation boxes to habitat restoration, they partner with fisheries agencies to restore salmonid populations. Now the scope of stewardship sector involvement and influence is expanding beyond the creek channel.

    “Over time, MVIHES has morphed from Stewards of the Plan to Stewards of the Watershed. Beginning in 2011, the MVIHES action plan has concentrated on Shelly Creek. One of five Englishman River tributaries, it is the last fish-bearing creek flowing through the City of Parksville,” states Peter Law, MVIHES Vice-President & Director, Partnership for Water Sustainability in BC.

    Restore Watershed Hydrology, Prevent Stream Erosion,
    Ensure Fish Survival

    Kim Stephens_Oc2017_120p“Context is everything!,” wrote Kim Stephens, Partnership Executive Director, in the preface to Shelly Creek is the City of Parksville’s last fish-bearing stream! 

    The Partnership is one of five organizations that co-funded development of the Shelly Creek Water Balance & Sediment Reduction PlanThe Pacific  Salmon Foundation was the primary funder. The other three funders comprised the Mid Vancouver Island Habitat Enhancement Society, City of Parksville and the Regional District of Nanaimo.

    Reflections on Moving from Awareness to Action

    “Through their involvement in MVIHES, community stewardship volunteers are demonstrating what it means to embrace ‘shared responsibility’ and take the initiative to lead by example,” continued Kim Stephens.

    “A paramount goal is to “get it right” in the stream channel. Their challenge is to move from stop-gap remediation of in-stream problems to long-term restoration of a properly functioning watershed.

    “The Shelly Creek experience foreshadows that an informed stream stewardship sector may prove to be a difference-maker that instigates and accelerates implementation of the ‘whole-system, water balance’ approach in the Georgia Basin region and beyond,” concluded Kim Stephens.

    “As a co-funder, the Partnership is thrilled to have contributed to the Shelly Creek Plan. Our commitment to the Shelly Creek stream stewardship volunteers is to tell their story far and wide. This Watershed Case Profile is the launch of the storytelling process!”

    INFORM, EDUCATE, INSPIRE: Apply the "BC Process" for moving from awareness to action.

    INFORM, EDUCATE, INSPIRE: Apply the “BC Process” for moving from awareness to action.

    Table of Contents

    The table is a synopsis. It distills the essence of each section into a succinct statement. These create a storyline. Readers are asked to pause and reflect on them before reading the story itself.

    To Learn More:

    To download the 6th in the Watershed Case Profile Series, click on Shelly Creek is Parksville’s last fish-bearing stream! – Restore Watershed Hydrology, Prevent Stream Erosion, Ensure Fish Survival.

    Shelley_Table of Contents

     

     

     

  6. ATTEND & BE INSPIRED: Nanaimo Water Symposium – Collaboration Success Stories on Vancouver Island (April 11-12)

    Comments Off on ATTEND & BE INSPIRED: Nanaimo Water Symposium – Collaboration Success Stories on Vancouver Island (April 11-12)

    Note to Reader;

    Context is important. In the 1970s, the first streamkeeper groups were formed in British Columbia. They had an immediate impact. They galvanized government into action. By the 1990s, a landmark success story was the Urban Salmon Habitat Program. It forged relationships between local governments and stewardship groups. This helped to set in motion a provincial ‘whole-system, water balance’ journey that continues to this day.

    Fast forward to the present. Anecdotal evidence suggests a groundswell of heightened awareness of the watershed context for “the creek that flows through my backyard”. Awareness is translating into involvement and empowerment to make a difference.

    On April 11-12, 2018, join us in Nanaimo for a symposium on watershed stewardship, the water balance and restorative development. Adapting to climate change requires transformation in how we value nature and service land. An informed stewardship sector can be a catalyst for action. Learn what stewardship groups are already doing to make a difference!

    Download a copy of the PROGRAM BROCHURE
    To register, visit https://www.civicinfo.bc.ca/event/2018/Nanaimo-Water-Symposium

    The Hard Work of Hope: Water Stewardship in a Changing Climate – Collaboration Success Stories

    Did we make the wrong land use decisions?

    “Changes in the global climate are accelerating and disrupting the water cycle. Local consequences, ofttimes negative, are magnified. To make the right decisions, we need to understand how and where the water rhythms are changing. We must adjust our land use and infrastructure practices before its too late,” states John Finnie, Chair of the Nanaimo Symposium Organizing Committee.

    “Local government collaboration with the stewardship sector is a key component of this undertaking. Learning from other’s activities, challenges and successes provides a pathway to changing our land use and infrastructure servicing practices.

    “In addition to being a learning event, the symposium will provide opportunity for delegates to hear from and interact with representatives from various sectors of the water community, and provide impetus for the implementation of meaningful environmental policy and procedures.”

    “Attend the symposium on April 11-12, 2018. Listen. Hear. Be heard. And make a difference.”

    Community Empowerment & Sustainable Partnerships with Local Government

    A panel segment is the heart of the program. It has two parts: first, panel reflections; then, ‘town-hall interaction’. The panel will showcase success stories resulting from local government and stewardship sector collaboration.

    Panel members will paint a picture of what collaboration must look like in practice to truly achieve the vision for restorative development. The desired outcome: participants will be inspired to make a difference!

    Convening for Action in the Nanaimo Region:

    Communication, cooperation, coordination and collaboration – have you thought about the power of the 4Cs? When all four are in play, good things happen.

    Are you aware of the beneficial outcomes that are flowing from collaboration between local government and the stewardship sector in the Nanaimo region?

    Citizen Science:

    The foregoing questions provide context for the two-part panel segment of the program.
    • PRIMING THE AUDIENCE: In their prepared remarks, panelists will shine the spotlight on the role played by the stewardship sector in building trust and delivering outcomes through effective partnerships with local governments. They will give examples of how their project(s) relate to the foregoing.
    • TOWN-HALL INTERACTION: Panelists will reflect on the value of ‘citizen science’ and how it can be leveraged to achieve two complementary objectives: educate the local community (public); and provide an impetus for political action that results in implementation of environmental policy at the local and/or provincial level.
    The panel lens is a watershed lens – what do we want this watershed to look like? The desired outcome: the audience will be energized and inspired to make a difference regarding restorative development!

     

    To Learn More:

    Download a copy of the PROGRAM BROCHURE
    To register, visit https://www.civicinfo.bc.ca/event/2018/Nanaimo-Water-Sym

  7. SAVE THE DATE TO BE INSPIRED – The Hard Work of Hope – Collaboration Success Stories on Vancouver Island (April 11-12, 2018)

    Comments Off on SAVE THE DATE TO BE INSPIRED – The Hard Work of Hope – Collaboration Success Stories on Vancouver Island (April 11-12, 2018)

    Note to Reader:

    On April 11-12, 2018, join us in Nanaimo for a symposium on watershed stewardship, the water balance and restorative development. Adapting to climate change requires transformation in how we value nature and service land. An informed stewardship sector can be a catalyst for action. Learn what stewardship groups are already doing to make a difference!

    Download a copy of the PROGRAM BROCHURE
    To register, visit https://www.civicinfo.bc.ca/event/2018/Nanaimo-Water-Symposium

    Nanaimo Water Symposium: Water Stewardship in a Changing Climate –Collaboration Success Stories

    The Hard Work of Hope

    Renowned author and speaker Bob Sandford, EPCOR Chair for Water & Climate Security at the United Nations University, will set the tone for the symposium.  At a public lecture on the evening of April 11, his inspirational message will be a call to action.

    “What we are essentially talking about is reconciliation: going back to the headwaters of where we got our relationships with water and with one another wrong so that we can start back down the river of time – this time together – with a full understanding of the importance of embracing a water-first approach to planning human interventions in the environment,” states Bob Sandford.

    A Compelling Call to Action:

    The warming of the planet’s atmosphere is causing water to move more quickly and disruptively through the global water cycle. Local consequences are magnified. To make the right choices moving forward, decision-makers at all levels and scales must understand how and where the rhythms of water are changing. We must collaborate to adapt our land use and infrastructure servicing practices appropriately!

    Successful watershed restoration in the built environment depends on all the players – in particular politicians, planners, landowners, designers, implementers and asset managers – embracing, and collaborating to implement, a ‘design with nature’ land ethic.

    Local government collaboration with the stewardship sector is pivotal on this journey. Tapping into this resource would harness energy and potential to ‘get it right’ as communities develop and redevelop land. Attend the symposium and learn more on April 11-12, 2018.