Category:

Showcasing British Columbia’s Watershed-Based Approach

Think and Act Like a Watershed (Part 3): A journey to a water-resilient future starts with the first rain garden


“We chose to work with road runoff because roads are the common denominator across all urban land uses,” states Jennifer McIntyre. “We don’t need to know everything about how toxic runoff is, or how it causes toxicity, to be able to do something about the problem. To date, the experimental results are pretty impressive – for example, 100% fish dead in polluted runoff compared with 100% fish survival in the same water after it had been filtered.”

Read Article

Think and Act like a Watershed (Part 2): Get the hydrology right and residential water quality typically follows along


“Unless and until land development practices mimic the natural water balance, communities cannot expect to restore the biological communities within streams. Simply put, hydrology hits first and hardest – one could pour an equivalent volume of distilled water into a stream, and the consequences for stream health would be the same as if it was urban runoff,” stated Richard Horner.

Read Article

Think and Act like a Watershed (Part 1): Harness Nature to Adapt to a Changing Climate


Ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) is a combination of two other significant concepts: EBM (ecosystem-based management) and climate change adaptation. “The research by Julia Berry provides rainwater and adaptation planners with an overview of EbA from principles to practice in British Columbia. The evaluation framework can be used to assess and score the extent to which provincial, regional or municipal documents incorporate EbA principles,” concludes Kim Stephens.

Read Article

Moving Towards Sustainable Watershed Systems: “We need to re-learn basically ‘how we think’, using both the right and left hemispheres of our brain,” says Eva Kras, author of THE BLOCKAGE


“Short-term thinking governs much of what we do. In many organizations, the long-term view has somehow become excluded. Both ways of thinking are important, but the sad part is that we have convinced ourselves that the Left Hemisphere can do EVERYTHING. The new research by Ian McGilchrist now ‘turns the table’ because it demonstrates the true and indispensable role of the Right Hemisphere for ALL sustainable development work,” states Eva Kras.

Read Article

Flashback to 2003: "Re-Inventing Urban Hydrology for Watershed Protection" – British Columbia process showcased by EPA to an American audience at national conference


“The timing of this national conference, and the exposure to the British Columbia experience, coincided well with the implementation of U.S. EPA’s Phase II NPDES Storm Water Program during 2003,” recalls Eric Strecker. “We invited Kim Stephens to present a paper about the British Columbia Guidebook because we thought it would make a good fit with the theme of thinking beyond regulations to solving the problem.”

Read Article

MILESTONE RECOGNITION IN 2012 – 'Stormwater Planning: A Guidebook for British Columbia' has proven to be a catalyst for decade-long action


“In 2002, the Guidebook applied a science-based understanding, developed the water balance methodology to establish performance targets, and demonstrated that urban watershed restoration could be accomplished over a 50-year time-frame as and when communities redevelop,” states Peter Law. “The premise underpinning the Guidebook was that land development and watershed protection can be compatible.”

Read Article

Resilient Rainwater Management: An Introduction to the 2014 Across Canada Workshop Series


“Sustainable and resilient are complementary terms that draw attention to the future, and help focus thought and action. However, use of resilient more clearly shines the spotlight on Context, Intent and Results. Sustainable refers to attaining certain conditions in the context of social, economic and environmental considerations. Resilient in a biological sense is primarily the ability for an ecosystem to recover from an intervention,” states Erik Karlsen.

Read Article

Watermark magazine article initiates branding of "Sustainable Service Delivery for Watershed Systems"


“By 2017, an over-arching program goal (for the Georgia Basin Inter-Regional Education Initiative) is that local governments in the five participating regions would truly understand how natural systems support municipal services and would be able to fully integrate this understanding and associated methodologies into programs, planning and funding,” states Kim Stephens.

Read Article

FLASHBACK TO 2011: "Visualize what we want our watersheds to look like in 50 years" – theme for ISMP Course Correction in British Columbia


“The genesis for Integrated Stormwater Management Plans was a desire to integrate the community, engineering, planning and environmental perspectives. The implicit goal was to build and/or rebuild communities in balance with ecology. Local governments knew they had to do business differently to restore watershed health,” stated Robert Hicks.

Read Article

Watershed Case Profile Series: Rain Gardens Help Restore Nature to Urban Areas in Delta


“Delta is making ‘green infrastructure’ a standard practice in our community. These are no longer just ‘pilot projects’. Creating a watershed health legacy will ultimately depend on how well we are able to achieve rain water management improvements on both public and private sides of a watershed. There is a huge up-side if the private sector embraces their contribution to shared responsibility,” states Hugh Fraser.

Read Article