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Waterbucket.ca provides access to British Columbia Guidance Documents on Watershed-Based Rainwater Management

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"Recognizing that it is often challenging for practitioners to find what they are looking for, we believe that we have filled a gap. This page links to British Columbia documents that provide communities, engineers and land use professionals with guidance for implementing watershed-based planning, rainwater management, green infrastructure, and water sustainability," reports Mike Tanner.

TO TEST DRIVE…

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Click on "Read Article" first. Then click on links to access these versions of the Express: North Vancouver, Cowichan Region, Surrey, Coquitlam and Comox Valley in BC; and Membertou in Cape Breton.

Water Balance Model – On Tour!

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"Have a look at some of the Water Balance Model slideshow presentations that have been made to industry and government groups starting in 2001. This includes some of the early presentations on the Water Balance Methodology that helped pave the way for the paradigm-shift from 'peak flow thinking' to 'volume-based thinking'. The many presentations created awareness and influenced expectations," stated Ted van der Gulik.

DOWNLOAD: Stormwater Planning: A Guidebook for British Columbia

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"Released in 2002, the Guidebook provides a framework for effective rainwater management throughout the province. This tool for local governments presents a methodology for moving from planning to action that focuses on implementing early action where it is most needed," states Laura Maclean. "The Guidebook approach contrasts with conventional 'flows-and-pipes' stormwater management."

FLASHBACK TO 2013: “In the 21st century we are implementing smaller-scale solutions. In the long-term, this will produce a savings for the City and taxpayers,” wrote Councillor Lisa Helps in a primer about Victoria’s Stormwater Utility

In 2014 the City of Victoria will be rolling out its new Stormwater Utility. "This is something that makes the City of Victoria a leader in Canada. It’s innovative because it encourages people, at the level of their own properties, to take responsibility and leadership for creating solutions – like rain barrels, cisterns, raingardens, bioswales – that are good for the planet and good for the City’s stormwater system," wrote Lisa Helps.

FLASHBACK TO 2012: “A key challenge has been translating global climate science to local land-use decisions. The new Climate Change Module in the Water Balance Model helps overcome this obstacle,” stated Chris Jensen, Senior Policy Analyst, Government of British Columbia

“If mitigation is about CARBON, then adaptation is about WATER. Hence, being able to quickly and effectively model how the ‘water balance’ may change over time is a critical input to local government decision processes," stated Chris Jensen. " We heard from communities that they desired an easy to use tool, one that would help them understand and identify evaluate options for climate adaptation. This need served as a catalyst for development of the Climate Change Module."

FLASHBACK TO 2012: Re-built on a new platform to expand its capabilities, the ‘Water Balance Model powered by QUALHYMO’ is a shared legacy that resulted from a building blocks process over time

"This unique web-based tool is the shared legacy of a team of senior practitioners," stated Kim Stephens in 2012. "It is the outcome of a process that has depended on the commitment of a number of organizations, and especially the efforts of the champions within those organizations, to produce a series of deliverables that successively advanced the practice of rainwater management within British Columbia."

FLASHBACK TO 2011: Watch Philadelphia’s “Green City, Clean Waters” Video – “Changing the world, or even one small piece of, requires a lot of trial and error,” stated Howard Neukrug, the visionary behind Philadelphia’s bold plan to peel back the concrete and asphalt and replace it with green infrastructure

Philadelphia has developed a US$1.6 bllion plan to transform the city over the next 20 years. The plan reimagines the city as an oasis of rain gardens, green roofs, permeable pavements, thousands of additional trees, and more. According to Howard Neukrug, the Philadelphia Water Department’s Director of the Office of Watersheds, "We are taking that (old, grey infrastructure) barrier down, and are stopping the water from ever hitting the system."

FLASHBACK TO 2010: “Canada Mortgage & Housing Corporation is providing financial support for the Rainwater Harvesting Module to add to the capabilities of the Water Balance Model,” stated Cate Soroczan, CMHC Senior Researcher

"The early success of the Water Balance Model in British Columbia generated interest in expanding the focus of the tool to reach a national audience. This culminated in the decision by CMHC in 2004 to fund development of the national portal," stated Cate Soroczan. "The rainwater harvesting and storage component with variable sizing and demand will allow the user to optimize both the demand for potable water and the size of the physical storage."

FLASHBACK TO 2010: “Publication of the Technical Manual for the Water Balance Model allows users to follow the numbers,” stated Richard Boase, Co-Chair of the Inter-Governmental Partnership, at the time of its release

“The community of Water Balance Model users had been asking for a technical manual that documents the intelligent WBM interface that translates user information into data used by the QUALHYMO engine. The lens for manual development was the engineering user who wants to follow the numbers from the WBM interface keystroke to the QUALHYMO file. In a nutshell, it is all about data mapping," stated Richard Boase in 2010.

FLASHBACK TO 2010: “Erosion is a key factor in water resources management. Managing this effect has become a clear requirement,” stated Jim Dumont when Environment Canada and CMHC co-funded addition of the Stream Erosion Module to the Water Balance Model

"A principal result of increased volumes and rates of flow associated with urbanization is the consequent increase in stream erosion,” stated Jim Dumont. “This can be an economically important factor as maintenance and hydraulic capacity is affected, and it can also be an ecologically important factor as habitat is impaired through degradation, aggregation and increased suspended solids transport.”

FLASHBACK TO 2009: “Our goal in constantly improving the Water Balance Model is to serve an ever widening range of user sophistication and problem-solving capabilities,” stated Ted van der Gulik when he announced the plan for implementing a $500,000 program over 3 years

“Among the many enhancements that will be implemented over the next three years are capabilities not currently available in commercial software," stated Ted van der Gulik. “The rapid growth and success of the present second generation model has made it clear that the time has come for the next bold leap forward in the evolution of our web-based tool."

FLASHBACK TO 2008: “We are using the slogan ‘The New Business As Usual’ to convey the message that practices that until now have been viewed as the exception must become the norm,” stated Dale Wall, Deputy Minister, when he announced that Vancouver Island would be the demonstration region for green infrastructure capacity building

"Vancouver Island is the pilot for the Learning Lunch Seminar Series, a continuing education program for local government practitioners. This program will build capacity to apply 'the new Water Balance Model', and it will help make the transition to The New Business As Usual," announced Dale Wall. "The Cowichan Valley Regional District and the City of Courtenay are the host local governments for series in the Spring and Fall, respectively."

FLASHBACK TO 2007: “Funding provided by the Canadian Water Network enabled us to bring together a pan-Canadian team of academics and practitioners”, stated Dr. Hans Schreier when introducing the vision for a National Knowledge Translation Strategy led by the University of BC

“The Vancouver get-together is the first of three cross-Canada working sessions, and will be followed by an event in Calgary later in 2007, with the third event to be held in Toronto in early 2008”, stated Dr. Hans Schreier. Three universities are involved in the project: UBC, Guelph and Waterloo. Three local government organizations are also involved in order to provide a practitioner perspective for each of three participating provinces.