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ASSET MANAGEMENT BC NEWSLETTER (Summer 2018): “BC municipalities and regional districts, their respective CAOs and staff would benefit from guidance to a common communications approach to enhance asset management practices,” wrote David Allen, Chief Administrative Officer, City of Courtenay


“Ironically, while AM BC has championed the need for sustainable service delivery, it has increasingly recognized the need to address its own sustainability in maintaining an independent and neutral position in supporting other local governments,” stated David Allen. “This is possibly why there has not yet been a collation of policy practices offered in support of CAOs and council/board elected officials where, from a public administrator’s perspective, something of that nature would be very useful.”

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ASSET MANAGEMENT BC NEWSLETTER (Winter 2018): “Operationalizing Asset Management: It’s about People, Too” – David Love, City of Courtenay


“In the spring of 2016 ‘Operationalizing Asset Management’ was ready. We then developed a comprehensive change management plan consisting of workshops, presentations and dialogue amongst all the affected persons,” stated David Love. “The whole thing was led by the CAO, and supported by Council’s Asset Management Policy that had set guidelines for implementing an organization-wide Asset Management processes. This was completed in the fall and the changes were then implemented en masse.”

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ASSET MANAGEMENT BC NEWSLETTER (Summer 2018): Spall but Mighty: A Closer Look at the Service Sustainability Assessment Tool in Action – Interview with Doug Allin, CAO, Township of Spallumcheen


“It can be daunting, particularly in small communities with limited staff. That’s why you need to start small. Just jump in and get going. Pick one aspect to focus on and start with a plan. One of the first things I do in any community is start with the education – from the inside out. We can’t embrace Asset Management if our decision-makers don’t know what it is, why it’s necessary, and how it will benefit our community,” stated Doug Allin. “It all starts with a conversation, and asking: Is that what we want for our community?”

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ASSET MANAGEMENT BC NEWSLETTER (Winter 2018): Rossland’s Asset Management Planning Takes Centre Stage at Asset Management BC Conference


“In the recent past, our approach to infrastructure renewal was closer to a policy of Disaster Response than a systematic strategy to upgrade our essential services based on a comprehensive plan,” stated Mayor Kathy Moore. “But as part of its overall strategic plan, the current council has been undergoing a process to address asset management. That process has included an organizational assessment that allowed the city to “develop a clear understanding of where the organization needs to build Asset Management Capacity over the next two to seven years.”

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ASSET MANAGEMENT BC NEWSLETTER (Summer 2017): “Climate risks are another layer of risk to consider in the management of assets,” stated Dr. Guy Felicio


“Lack of data and certainty has not stopped municipalities from providing services, managing their assets, and making effective and efficient use of their scarce resources. Extreme weather and future climate uncertainty is another variable to consider; but where to start? There are no reasons not to consider climate uncertainty in asset management. Ultimately, the focus is on the service and the community, and ensuring critical assets maintain functionality during the extreme event, and recover quickly any functionality lost!”

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Green Infrastructure in the United Kingdom: “These are truly modern times, and we need truly modern water management solutions to keep up,” stated Dr. Jason Shingleton at the Infragreen Conference


“With water such a major global issue, it’s vital that we make use of every available opportunity to save, re-use and re-cycle water and, where we return it back to the ground, we do so in a managed way,” stated Dr Jason Shingleton. Hence, it is imperative that the design of infrastructure changes to become more environmentally friendly. He urged using Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems on the roofs of high-rise buildings to manage rainwater and reuse it to nourish the trees and vegetation planted on ‘green roofs’.

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Be the Hands that Restore the Land: “Physical geography should be integral to larger ecology and not just a beautification tool,” says landscape architect Akshay Kaul


“There is a severe shortfall in human resource to manage the environmental challenges in planning and design. Consider the Himalayas. Over the years, the less steep land has been built upon. We are left with very steep land to build on. It poses huge challenges in terms of creating roads, managing storm water, sub-surface drainage system, erosion and slope stabilization. The present techniques of retaining walls through concrete or stone are expensive and a visual eyesore—they do not take the more important issue of hydrology into consideration,” states Akshay Kaul.

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DOWNLOAD: “The Story of the 2008 Vancouver Island Learning Lunch Seminar Series” – following release of Living Water Smart, this grass-roots capacity-building program was undertaken in response to the Province’s call to action create greener communities and prepare for climate change


Inter-departmental participation by all member local governments effectively meant closing front counters on three Fridays for most of the day so that planning, engineering, operations and building inspection staff could attend the Learning Lunch seminars. “Throughout the series, our theme and our challenge was to ask participants what will they do better or differently to achieve a shared vision for the Cowichan Valley,” stated David Hewetson, Building Inspector with the City of Duncan. “This is why it was so important to get everyone thinking in terms of the What – So What – Now What mind-map.”

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MUNICIPAL NATURAL ASSET MANAGEMENT IN BC: “We’re aiming to translate enthusiastic interest in our home-grown approach into real-world practice in municipalities and asset management organizations around the world,” says Emanuel Machado, CAO, Town of Gibsons


“We get it. It can feel incredibly daunting to implement a significant change to your established systems – even when there’s clear evidence that change will almost certainly help improve decision-making, reduce asset funding requirements and advance your community’s resilience to climate change over the long-term,” states Emanuel Machado. “That’s why the Town of Gibsons was first inspired to create “Advancing Municipal Natural Asset Management: The Town of Gibsons’ experience in financial planning and reporting” – otherwise known as ‘Advancing MNAM’.”

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CREATE GREENER COMMUNITIES, PREPARE FOR CLIMATE CHANGE: 2007 Vancouver Island Green Infrastructure Leadership Forum set the stage for “Living Water Smart, BC’s Water Plan”, and was the genesis for capacity-building programs that have rippled through time in changing the way local governments view creeksheds


“Look back to look forward. What have we learned? How do we pass that understanding (of what we have learned over the past 10 years) onto successive generations of land use, infrastructure and asset management professionals who do their work in the local government setting? How can we help them make informed choices that benefit from past experience? These are just some of the questions that guide the work of the Partnership for Water Sustainability in British Columbia,” stated Kim Stephens. In 2010, the responsibilities of BC’s Green Infrastructure Partnership were rolled into the Partnership for Water Sustainability.

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