Category:

Law and Policy Tools

FLASHBACK TO 2004: City of Courtenay established a precedent when it was the first BC municipality to adopt and implement a ‘Soil Depth Policy’ for rainwater management


The policy was adopted in January 2004 immediately after the City became a founding member of the Water Balance Model Partnership. The requirement was included in the Official Community Plan. “Because the City places importance on the soil sponge as a rainwater management tool, we explored options to ensure that developers and house builders fulfil their obligations to provide and preserve the minimum required depth,” stated Sandy Pridmore.

Read Article

The Green Infrastructure Guide: Issues, Implementation Strategies and Success Stories


The Green Infrastructure Guide is an invaluable reference document for those who embrace a ‘design with nature’ philosophy. “The Guide’s purpose is to encourage successful designs, by reporting on what the legal and policy strategies are, what some of the implementation hurdles (and solutions) have been, and how they have been effective in achieving sustainability goals,” wrote Susan Rutherford.

Read Article

Sustainable Watershed Systems: New California law recognizes meadows, streams as green infrastructure


“It’s a major shift in the way we think about conservation — nature isn’t just ‘nice to have’ but an absolutely critical piece of our water infrastructure systems,” said Genevieve Bennett. “There are hundreds of communities all over the world who understood that years ago, and started figuring out how to make sure they were protecting their water sources. And now we’re starting to see that concept making its way into higher-level policy.”

Read Article

Watershed Health: game-changers enable local government action in BC


“Looking into the future, collaboratively developed Water Sustainability Plans can integrate water and land use planning and can be combined with other local, regional or provincial planning processes to address water-related issues. “The scale and scope of each plan – and the process used to develop it – would be unique, and would reflect the needs and interests of the watersheds affected,” states Jennifer Vigano.

Read Article

FLASHBACK TO 2009: Ministry of Community Development Circular informed BC local governments about ‘Beyond the Guidebook’


“Beyond the Guidebook supports and/or complements other provincial initiatives, notably: Living Water Smart and the Green Communities Project. Collectively, these initiatives establish expectations that, in turn, will influence the form and function of the built environment in general and green infrastructure on the ground in particular,” wrote Glen Brown.

Read Article

FLASHBACK TO 2007: At Water Balance Model Partners Forum, the BC Ministry of Environment’s Peter Law introduced “Develop with Care” to a Metro Vancouver audience


“Decisions related to urban and rural land development in this province are shared by many; therefore, this document is intended to support and encourage good decision making by all those involved in land development in British Columbia. Develop with Care emphasizes the use of the Water Balance Model to achieve desired rainwater management outcomes”, stated Peter Law.

Read Article

“Develop with Care 2014” promotes ways to retain and create environmental function and resilience as communities grow in British Columbia


Develop with Care 2014 is a tool to engage with local governments, planners, developers and others involved in land use about the provincial mandate and issues. “Develop with Care 2014 incorporates the integration piece that now makes the direct connection to the Built Environment and the local government mandate. A focus on the Built Environment provides an opportunity to look at environmental protection from perspective of land use, and get out in front of issues,” stated Helene Roberge.

Read Article

CONVENING FOR ACTION IN NORTH AMERICA: “Green and practical solutions urgently needed for excess stormwater management,” concluded the inter-governmental Commission for Environmental Cooperation


“Green infrastructure and better land-use planning not only mitigate excess stormwater effects, but can also bring considerable environmental, social and economic benefits. We also know that it is equally important to promote local community engagement in the adoption of innovative, practical and environmentally sustainable solutions through better public education and participation on the issue,” stated Gustavo Alanís-Ortega, JPAC Chair.

Read Article