Category:

Green Roofs / Buildings

MITIGATION OF CLIMATE CHANGE: Researchers at the University of Technology Sydney conclude that Australian cities are lagging behind in greening up their buildings


“We modelled what could be delivered in the City of Sydney and the City of Melbourne based on the measures taken in Singapore (which is voluntary-heavy), London (voluntary-light), Rotterdam (voluntary-medium) and Toronto (mandatory). We combined this with data on actual green building projects in 2017 in Sydney and Melbourne to show the potential increase of projects in each city based on the four policies,” stated Paul Brown.

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Green Infrastructure in the United Kingdom: “These are truly modern times, and we need truly modern water management solutions to keep up,” stated Dr. Jason Shingleton at the Infragreen Conference


“With water such a major global issue, it’s vital that we make use of every available opportunity to save, re-use and re-cycle water and, where we return it back to the ground, we do so in a managed way,” stated Dr Jason Shingleton. Hence, it is imperative that the design of infrastructure changes to become more environmentally friendly. He urged using Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems on the roofs of high-rise buildings to manage rainwater and reuse it to nourish the trees and vegetation planted on ‘green roofs’.

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Turn Cities into Gardens: This is why we should all be covering all our buildings with plants


“Design firm Arup just published a study on the benefits of plant-covered buildings – some of which are so green they look like they’ve been deserted by humans and are slowly being reclaimed by nature – and they found the benefits go way beyond just sucking up CO2 and looking pretty,” wrote David Nield. “The company’s engineers took a variety of measurements in five cities to see what impact extra greenery could have.”

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VIDEO: Mexico City’s Green Plan & Green Roofs


Tanya Müller García presents “Areas Verdes de la Ciudad de Mexico & Azoteas Naturada” – “Mexico City’s Green Plan & Green Roofs” providing a description of the Green Plan in Spanish with English subtitles. An Inventory of Green Areas of Mexico City is provided as well as inclusion for the first time of green roofs in the Cities Green Inventory. Tanya also presents some examples of green roofs in Mexico and future projects.

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Green City, Blue Waters: Roofs Going Green in Philadelphia


A green roof is more than just grass on top of a building. It is a rainwater capture and management system. “This should be viewed as a model of how to take a large building in a residential neighborhood, work with the neighbors to get a zoning variance, and then successfully redevelop it,” says Leo Addimando.

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Green Roofs for Healthy Cities Releases “Green Pages: 2014 Green Roof & Wall Industry Directory”


“Green Pages is the first comprehensive listing of Green Roof Professionals and corporate members and it will be a great resource to anyone looking for help with their green roof or wall project. Hard copy and digital issues provide numerous opportunities for widespread distribution in an industry that continues to receive double digit growth each year,” said Steven Peck.

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Low Carbon Auckland: Buildings and Green Infrastructure


The challenge, says Alex Cutler, is to convince developers and home builders that green is the new normal. “With what we know about the principles of designing and building for energy efficiency, and the statistics connecting poor respiratory health with damp, mouldy homes, the building and construction sector possesses a significant opportunity to address the challenge,” says Cutler.

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Urban Agriculture Blossoms in Ballard, Washington – Greenfire Campus used the Living Building Challenge as its roadmap


“The innovative rainwater management approach strives to create a built condition that mimics nature through the use of features that maintain or restore a site’s natural hydrologic conditions, achieving an effective net zero amount of impervious surfaces. The Earth, just like all forms of life, needs to be able to breathe and take in water in order to maintain or restore its health,” writes Mark Buehrer.

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