Gowanus Canal (New York City): America’s most toxic waterway gets some help

"Our infrastructure should be as resilient as the New Yorkers that call this great city home, Managing stormwater is a critical step on our path towards sustainability. This project proves that taking care of our environment and providing amenities to the public are not mutually exclusive — in fact, quite the opposite is true. The more green infrastructure and open space we create, the greater the public’s stewardship," stated New York City Council Member Stephen Levin.

Green Infrastructure in Kitsap County, Washington State: Manchester Stormwater “Park” achieves desired environmental and social outcomes in Puget Sound

“A spiral rain garden is the focal point of the park. Water that typically flows off the hillside is collected and treated through this facility. Then every half-hour, one cell of the three-cell spiral walls releases its water charge through rocks located on the sides of the figure. It then filters the water through the spiral, putting clean water back in to Puget Sound,” explained Andrew Nelson.

Looking At Rain Differently in New York City: “Everyone understands what a sponge does, even if they don’t understand green infrastructure or phytoremediation,” said Susannah Drake

Sponge Park is a $1.5 million pilot project that will determine whether such spaces can effectively prevent new pollution from entering the canal. "In the vast majority of storms, the park would capture all of the water flowing to a dead end at the canal," said Susannah Drake. During the heaviest rainfall, the park will at least cleanse and filter water before it flows into the canal."

From Stormwater to Rainwater: A Reorientation for LEED


"The most obvious change for stormwater professionals in LEED 2012 is that the credits for Stormwater Management in previous versions - separate credits for stormwater quality and quantity - have been combined into a single Rainwater Management credit within the Sustainable Sites category," writes Janice Kaspersen.

Trees grow in Brooklyn: A natural form of relief for overworked city sewers


NYC Green Infrastructure Plan - cover (360p) - October 2010
The advantage of the green infrastructure approach is that it delivers the same degree of water retention as "grey," but at a much lower price. When coupled with the traditional approach, it will allow the city to reduce sewer overflows into its waterways by 40% by 2030.

New Neighbourhoods and Green Infrastructure Innovation in Langley Township


Ramin Seifi (120p) - Director of the Community Development Division, Langley
Beyond the Guidebook 2010
The goal in showcasing innovation is to promote networking and build regional capacity....by sharing green infrastructure approaches, tools, experiences and lessons learned as an outcome of designing with nature.