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‘Design With Nature’ to Create Liveable Communities

MIMIC THE WATER BALANCE: Flashback to 2013 – the United States can learn from British Columbia experience, concluded Paul Crabtree, leader of the US-based Rainwater in Context Initiative


“The Canadians do appear to be ahead of the US in this field because the US EPA took a really bad approach to LID that was based on the premise that enforcing every site to the same standard would somehow fix the problems of water quality in the US,” commented Paul Crabtree. “The USA EPA approach has done some good, but has several crippling drawbacks.”

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FLASHBACK TO 2010: “Adapting to Climate Change – An Introduction for Canadian Municipalities” reported that the impacts of changing climate were already evident in Canada and globally


“The book provides municipal decision-makers and staff with information to help them understand the need for climate change adaptation and how to put adaptation measures in place. It includes 11 case studies that illustrate how municipalities of varying sizes from across the country are taking adaptation action now,” states Robert Hicks.

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VIDEO: Convening for Action at the Comox Valley Eco-Asset Symposium: “Restorative development is within your grasp. You know what to do. Go do it,” urged Bob Sandford in his closing reflections (March 2017)


“We cannot forget that there has been a huge investment in what we now know is an unsustainable status quo. Investment must now be shifted towards restoration that uses the forces of nature itself to help build more efficiently integrated infrastructure that as much as possible maintains itself. What a gift to the world that would be,” stated Bob Sandford. “If you want to live here in perpetuity, then you need to do this. Do not forget the urgency.”

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Vision for ‘designing with nature’ in Adelaide, Australia: Create a city that is greener, more comfortable, healthier and more liveable


Stephens Forbes is positive about the availability of great design practices in South Australia. “There are some great landscape architectural practices and garden designers in Adelaide and accordingly some great projects but I’m not seeing this translate into substantial change. Investment in a few major iconic greenspace projects would help build leadership and capacity and prepare Adelaide for the future.”

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FLASHBACK TO 2010: “The way we see the world is shaped by our vocabulary,” observed Metro Vancouver’s Robert Hicks when commenting on ‘what is an appropriate term to use’ for different uses of water in different languages


“Other languages like French and German often use more exact terms than English for 'stormwater' and 'wastewater', and this changes how relationships and worth are perceived,” states Robert Hicks. “The reason why other languages use more exact terms relates to the structural nature of those languages.

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“The Clean & Green Infrastructure Plan is a ‘Stormwater Overlay’ to guide our future,” stated Pittsburgh Mayor Peduto


“Going ‘Green First’ means we can meet our regulatory requirements while also reducing local flooding, decreasing basement backups, improving the resiliency of our communities to disaster during extreme weather events, and enhance economic development in the City,” stated Mayor Bill Peduto. “The draft plan proposes to manage runoff from 1,835 acres with green infrastructure over the next twenty years.”

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“The Sydney Green Grid envisions green infrastructure as a three-dimensional envelope that surrounds, connects and infuses buildings, streets and utilities,” wrote Daniel Bennett, President, Australian Institute of Landscape Architects


“The Sydney Green Grid underscores the value of green and open space as pivotal to the choices we make when promoting economic growth, health and well-being.” wrote Daniel Bennett. “As a network, it will provide links and connections between places, encourage walking and cycling, highlight landscape and heritage, and support local economies. Future investment in parks and recreation will play a vital role in Sydney’s ability to attract business and create jobs.”

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FLASHBACK TO 2010: How city design can help save the planet: Patrick Condon’s Seven Rules for Sustainable Communities


“In any journey, it helps to start with a look back from where we once came. The end of the Second World War marks the time after which cities changed the most. Many compelling reasons drove the crucial choices we made at that time,” writes Patrick Condon. “It is therefore up to a new generation to coalesce around a common vision for the future — a common vision deeply grounded in the pioneering efforts of the previous generation.”

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GREEN+BLUE INFRASTRUCTURE: “Every author has emphasized how intertwined the social and economic dimensions of our ‘watershed assets’ are with their ecological benefits,” wrote Julie Schooling, Sitelines magazine co-editor (Oct 2016 issue)


A Blue-Green City aims to recreate a naturally oriented water cycle while contributing to the amenity of the city by bringing water management and green infrastructure together. As co-editor of the October 2016 issue of Sitelines magazine, Julie Schooling was responsible for developing the storyline and overseeing story development. “It was so exciting to have such a diverse and relevant group of contributors for this issue,” she said.

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YOUTUBE VIDEO: A watershed moment at the Gaining Ground Leadership Summit – “Practices that until now have been viewed as the exception must become the norm,” stated Dale Wall, Deputy Minister in his keynote address (May 2008)


The Deputy Minister used the occasion of a keynote address at the Gaining Ground Summit to make an inter-ministerial announcement. “We are using the slogan The New Business As Usual to convey the message that… to further advance implementation of green infrastructure…. we have to build regulatory models and develop models of practice and expertise,” stated Dale Wall, Deputy Minister.

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