FLASHBACK TO 2010: “The way we see the world is shaped by our vocabulary,” observed Metro Vancouver’s Robert Hicks when commenting on ‘what is an appropriate term to use’ for different uses of water in different languages


"Other languages like French and German often use more exact terms than English for 'stormwater' and 'wastewater', and this changes how relationships and worth are perceived," states Robert Hicks. “The reason why other languages use more exact terms relates to the structural nature of those languages.

“The Clean & Green Infrastructure Plan is a ‘Stormwater Overlay’ to guide our future,” stated Pittsburgh Mayor Peduto

“Going ‘Green First’ means we can meet our regulatory requirements while also reducing local flooding, decreasing basement backups, improving the resiliency of our communities to disaster during extreme weather events, and enhance economic development in the City,” stated Mayor Bill Peduto. "The draft plan proposes to manage runoff from 1,835 acres with green infrastructure over the next twenty years."

“The Sydney Green Grid envisions green infrastructure as a three-dimensional envelope that surrounds, connects and infuses buildings, streets and utilities,” wrote Daniel Bennett, President, Australian Institute of Landscape Architects

"The Sydney Green Grid underscores the value of green and open space as pivotal to the choices we make when promoting economic growth, health and well-being." wrote Daniel Bennett. "As a network, it will provide links and connections between places, encourage walking and cycling, highlight landscape and heritage, and support local economies. Future investment in parks and recreation will play a vital role in Sydney’s ability to attract business and create jobs."

FLASHBACK TO 2010: How city design can help save the planet: Patrick Condon’s Seven Rules for Sustainable Communities

"In any journey, it helps to start with a look back from where we once came. The end of the Second World War marks the time after which cities changed the most. Many compelling reasons drove the crucial choices we made at that time," writes Patrick Condon. "It is therefore up to a new generation to coalesce around a common vision for the future -- a common vision deeply grounded in the pioneering efforts of the previous generation."

GREEN+BLUE INFRASTRUCTURE: “Every author has emphasized how intertwined the social and economic dimensions of our ‘watershed assets’ are with their ecological benefits,” wrote Julie Schooling, Sitelines magazine co-editor (Oct 2016 issue)

A Blue-Green City aims to recreate a naturally oriented water cycle while contributing to the amenity of the city by bringing water management and green infrastructure together. As co-editor of the October 2016 issue of Sitelines magazine, Julie Schooling was responsible for developing the storyline and overseeing story development. "It was so exciting to have such a diverse and relevant group of contributors for this issue," she said.

YOUTUBE VIDEO: A watershed moment at the Gaining Ground Leadership Summit – “Practices that until now have been viewed as the exception must become the norm,” stated Dale Wall, Deputy Minister in his keynote address (May 2008)

The Deputy Minister used the occasion of a keynote address at the Gaining Ground Summit to make an inter-ministerial announcement. "We are using the slogan The New Business As Usual to convey the message that... to further advance implementation of green infrastructure.... we have to build regulatory models and develop models of practice and expertise,” stated Dale Wall, Deputy Minister.

FLASHBACK TO 2010: “Topsoil is the interface between rainwater management and drought management,” stated Ray Fung when the Green Infrastructure Partnership released the Topsoil Primer Set

Rainwater management is about managing the spectrum of rainfall events, and is at the heart of water-centric green infrastructure. “An absorbent topsoil layer has emerged as a fundamental building block for achieving water sustainability outcomes through implementation of green infrastructure,” stated Ray Fung. “If we can show how to get the topsoil part right, then other parts of the water sustainability equation are more likely to follow."

FLASHBACK TO 2010: Philadelphia Urban Water Leadership Conference represents a “watershed moment” in the United States because it linked green infrastructure practices to water sustainability outcomes

“The Clean Water America Alliance brought together green infrastructure leaders from around the United States," recalls Howard Neukrig. “A number of themes emerged during the conference, including: Green infrastructure has multiple economic, social, and environmental benefits, but it must work within the greater quilt of water management that includes traditional gray infrastructure.”

When nature is utilized in an infrastructure system, it is called “green infrastructure”

"The study by the National Association of Homebuilders (NAHB) demonstrates that green infrastructure is prevalent across the United States and its use is likely to expand because of the benefits provided. As the use of green infrastructure becomes more common, builders and developers should understand the options available, as well the green infrastructure practices that may be the most practical for their region and climate," wrote Ed Shadrick.

DESIGN WITH NATURE: Renowned developer and urban thinker Jonathan Rose argues for new criteria for urban planning and development in his epic book ‘The Well-Tempered City’

"The well-tempered city is not just a dream. Our current best practices in the planning, design, engineering, economics, social science, and governance of cities are moving us closer to increasing urban wellbeing. Even if these actions have only a modest effect when taken alone, their power emerges when they are integrated. Well-tempered cities will be refuges from volatility," wrote Jonathan Rose.