Published in 2017, “downstream: reimagining water” is an anthology that envisions an intergenerational, culturally inclusive, participatory water ethic to tackle climate change; and includes a chapter by Michael Blackstock on ‘interweaving’

“This book explores the key roles that culture, arts, and the humanities play in supporting healthy water-based ecology and provides local, global, and Indigenous perspectives on water that help to guide our societies in a time of global warming,” wrote Dr. Dorothy Christian, co-editor. She is dedicated to building and strengthening any alliances with non-Indigenous communities who are open to hearing how Indigenous ways of knowing informs relationships amongst all living things.

FLASHBACK TO 2009: “The Role of Water Resources Management” (Proceedings of a symposium held on the island of Capri, Italy) – Michael Blackstock’s work on Blue Ecology recognized by the International Association of Hydrological Sciences

"Water is a core human interest upon which we can build collaborative cross-cultural climate change strategies," wrote Michael Blackstock. "No longer is our goal 'sustainable development'—to plan for a high standard of living for our children. Our goal must now be 'sustainable survival'—to plan and behave in a cross-culturally collaborative manner that ensures children, generations from now, can survive with dignity in a world where respect for water and our climate is ubiquitous."

FLASHBACK TO 2009: City of Surrey hosted Metro Vancouver Water Balance Model Forum

"Living Water Smart provides a framework and sets a direction. The purpose in convening for action is to establish consistent expectations on-the-ground: This is what we want to achieve, and this is how we will get there. Our immediate objective in convening for action is to encourage ‘green choices’ that will ripple through time," stated Kim Stephens.

ARTICLE: Sustaining the Flow of Water Ethics

“It’s important now that we realize that water policy and eff ective improvement of the way we manage water is not merely a government strategy anymore— it has to be a broader societal commitment which includes the average citizen who has an interest in what’s happening in his or her watershed,” says Bob Sandford.