BOOK LAUNCH: “The book ‘downstream: reimagining water’ is an anthology and my chapter is titled Interweaving Weaver,” states Michael Blackstock, independent scholar and author

“Blue Ecology is an ecological philosophy, which emerged from interweaving First Nations and Western thought. It is just a starting point in this new era of interweaving,” states Michael Blackstock. “Our children’s children will be faced with daunting, complex, and urgent environmental problems. The impending crisis requires us to begin to lay a foundation for our children’s children to have a starting point, and some options to grasp in the urgent moment. We owe them hope.”

FLASHBACK TO 2005: “Implementing change is primarily a people matter, not a technical one,” wrote Erik Karlsen in a paper that introduced the What / So What / Now What / Then What mind-map as a foundation piece for convening for action

“Bridging the gap between interest and practice involves motivating practitioners to engage in ways that provide sufficient meaning to inspire them and lead to action. The desired outcome is implementation of on-the-ground changes in policies, programs, applied research, practitioner education and standards of practice that lead to full integration of land development and water management," stated Erik Karlsen.

ARTICLE: Planet Reconciliation – Interweaving Indigenous knowledge and western science to make water-first decisions through Blue Ecology (published in Water Canada magazine, March-April 2017)

"The journey to a water-resilient future starts with Western science acknowledging water for its central functional and spiritual roles in our world," states Michael Blackstock. "Blue Ecology has five guiding principles and aligns with the whole-system, water balance approach. Adoption of the principles – Spirit, Harmony, Respect, Unity and Balance - would move Blue Ecology from theory to practice, as an aid for water managers."

FLOWnGROW WORKSHOP: “I created a term called ‘A Water Rhythm’ to help describe how to wean plants from regular water supply,” explains Ken Salvail, the ‘Grower Coach’

The Okanagan Region is heavily dependent on irrigation to nourish crops and maintain greenspace throughout a parched region. Ken Salvail’s experience is that people in the Okanagan use more water than is needed. This results from a lack of understanding of how much water is enough. "The irrigation systems that I design and install tend to teach plants how to live with constant water rather than little water," wrote Ken Salvail.

Keeping on Track: Risk & Uncertainty at the Nexus of Water, Food and Biodiversity — a call to action by Bob Sandford, water champion & author, at FLOWnGROW workshop (November 2016)

“We need to get a better handle on how even non-tipping points in climate and other parts of the Earth system might cause truly abrupt tipping points in our social and political systems. We need to better understand the 'critical thresholds' that exist within our water and water-related climate systems and better connect them to associated tipping points ," stated Bob Sandford. “You have room to move. Move now while that room still exists."

“The Climate Nexus: Water, Food, Energy and Biodiversity in a Changing World” – a new book (2016) co-authored by Bob Sandford and Jon O’Riordan, water champions

“What we have not been good at is understanding the ecological effects of changes to the composition of the Earth’s atmosphere with induced warming,” states Bob Sandford. He insists that there needs to be agricultural revolution to retain far more carbon in soil. And he wants Canada to lead that revolution to 'protect crucial Earth system functions'. “I think we need agriculture that’s not just restorative but regenerative,” declares Bob Sandford.

FLOWnGROW! – A workshop on “Balancing Economy, Ecology and Settlement in the Okanagan” (November 29 in Kelowna)

CBC's Bob McDonald, host of Quirks & Quarks, will provide the big picture from a global perspective and beyond, once again reminding us of the limited amount of fresh water we have on earth, speaking to the need for a global water ethic and awareness as we collectively navigate an uncertain future. This will provide a rousing opening to the workshop. Bob McDonald, Chief Aaron Sam and Michael Blackstock will be the 'book ends' for the workshop.

CALL TO ACTION AT FLOWnGROW WORKSHOP: Science-based Understanding + Inter-generational Commitment = Water-Resilient Communities 

“The FLOWnGROW program has the real potential of influencing how we address water sustainability issues in BC going forward,” states Eric Bonham. "The themes, Whole Systems Approach, reflecting integration through inclusion, Blue Ecology, the interweaving of First Nations and Western Thought and Cathedral Thinking, the foresight and planning for future generations, will set the context for the day."

INSPIRING INNOVATION: “If British Columbia can do it, then there is no reason why we can’t do it too!,” stated Karenne Jurd, City of Newcastle (Australia), when reflecting on keynote addresses by Kim Stephens in 2001 and 2016

“In reflecting on our 2001 three day capacity building course in Newcastle, it did more than just build my capacity as a strategic natural resource planner. It fuelled my enthusiasm as an agent of change in our own 15 year journey in urban water cycle management," stated Karenne Jurd. “The window into BC water management he opened showed us ‘what was possible’. It was a seminal moment in time."

Primer on Sustainable Watershed Systems: Partnership for Water Sustainability in British Columbia urges communities to integrate “water balance solutions” into land use decisions

“Stream health and what happens on the land are connected. In the early 1990’s, the ‘Coho Salmon crisis’ raised the alarm that changes in hydrology caused by land development were resulting in small stream salmon demise. The stewardship sector was the catalyst for restorative action in BC," stated Peter Law. "Today, community organizations partner with local governments to monitor and restore local watershed health."