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FLASHBACK TO 2007 PUBLICATION: The Green Infrastructure Guide – Issues, Implementation Strategies and Success Stories

"Two complementary strategies can 'green' a community and its infrastructure: first, preserving as much as possible of the natural green infrastructure; and secondly, promoting designs that soften the footprint of development," wrote Susan Rutherford. "Green infrastructure design is engineering design that takes a ‘design with nature’ approach, to both mitigate the potential impacts of existing and future development and growth and to provide valuable services."

2004 Consultation Workshop about “Model Subdivision Bylaw & Green Infrastructure Standards” was the launch event for British Columbia’s Green Infrastructure Partnership

According to Chuck Gale, "For the purposes of articulating what we wish to accomplish over time, our short-term and long-term efforts will be guided by the following Mission Statement: the Green Infrastructure Partnership will provide leadership by developing practical tools and instruments for green infrastructure design practices and regulation, and by encouraging their application in BC."

FLASHBACK TO 2004 CONSULTATION WORKSHOP: What is “Green Infrastructure”?

“Using a narrow interpretation, green infrastructure refers to the ecological processes, both natural and engineered, that are the foundation for a healthy natural and built environment in communities,” wrote Deborah Curran. “Municipalities using the green infrastructure as an integral part of how development occurs find that it is often less costly than hard infrastructure, and also offers aesthetic, environmental, health and recreational benefits.”

FLASHBACK TO 2004: “Judge progress by the distance traveled, not the distance remaining,” stated Kim Stephens at Consultation Workshop for “Model Subdivision Bylaw & Green Infrastructure Standards”

“We have come a long way in just four years. Our experience in bringing the vision to fruition for the UniverCity Sustainable Community on Burnaby Mountain provides relevant context. It was not that long ago that the project was hanging by a thread. We have been successful in overcoming fear and doubt," stated Kim Stephens. “In 2000, translating high expectations for UniverCity into practical design guidelines meant revisiting accepted drainage engineering practice."

DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCE: Moving Towards Sustainable Watershed Systems, through Asset Management – What the “Whole-System, Water Balance Approach” means for Lowland Drainage in BC (May 2017)

"Many years ago, the province established a set of criteria which determined the level of drainage improvements that were deemed to be acceptable in terms of cost-benefit, and the ability to pay,” explains Ted van der Gulik. “The supporting analysis optimized the relationship between agricultural return on production and cost of drainage infrastructure investment. These have come to be known as ARDSA criteria. "

DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCE: Moving Towards Sustainable Watershed Systems, through Asset Management – Peer-based Learning is Motivating and Powerful (May 2017)

“The Regional District of Nanaimo (RDN) and Comox Valley presentations to our Regional Board were of high quality and relevant. Board members were fully engaged. Learning from each other is motivating and powerful,” stated Brian Carruthers, CAO, Cowichan Valley Regional District. "Those regions provide a range of experience that we can learn from: the RDN has a true region-wide service function; and Comox Valley has a watershed-based service."

DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCE: A program goal for the Georgia Basin Inter-Regional Education Initiative is to embed ‘state-of-the-art’ hydrology in engineering ‘standard practice’ (April 2017)

“Not only does water shape topography over time, but it sustains flora and fauna through its various functions: rainwater interception, surface water retention, infiltration, surface flows, inter-flows, and groundwater containment," stated Tim Pringle. “These systems share a critical characteristic – flow duration. The condition (degree of proper functioning) of each of the ecosystem functions provided by water may be described based on flow duration.”

DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCE: Watershed Moments – Something really good is happening in British Columbia (April 2017)

"We cannot forget that there has been a huge investment in what we now know is an unsustainable status quo. Investment must now be shifted towards restoration that uses the forces of nature itself to help build more efficiently integrated infrastructure that as much as possible maintains itself. What a gift to the world that would be," stated Bob Sandford. “If you want to live here in perpetuity, then you need to do this. Do not forget the urgency."

DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCE: Forester University Webinar on Protecting Urban Watersheds and Stream Health in British Columbia (April 2017)

"We are delighted to have Kim Stephens and Jim Dumont share British Columbia’s cutting-edge continuous simulation model, known as the Water Balance Methodology, in their upcoming, featured webinar,” stated Emily Shine. "At Forester University, we aim to position ourselves at the forefront of innovation in rainwater management and green infrastructure, and that is why we are calling Water Balance Methodology a webinar that cannot be missed."