Author Archives: Partnership for Water Sustainability

  1. Waterbucket eNews: Partnership for Water Sustainability launches a new season of “Celebrating the Champions” (September 2018 – June 2019)

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    Note to Readers:

    During the mid-September through mid-June period, the Partnership for Water Sustainability in British Columbia publishes a weekly e-Newsletter on Waterbucket eNews. The series showcases and celebrates successes and long-term good work in the local government setting in British Columbia and beyond. This setting includes the stewardship sector. 

    Everyone learns from stories, and the most compelling ones are based on the experience of those who are leading by example in their communities. Hence, we shine our spotlight on champions in those communities which are breaking new ground and establishing replicable precedents. Storylines touch lightly on technical matters, yet are grounded in a technical foundation. Stories are designed to connect dots. 

    The objective in sharing these stories is to engage, inform and educate multiple audiences whether elected, administrative, technical or stewardship. Stories in the series are built around quotable quotes. By adding the human touch, we find that the use of quotes make the stories both compelling and reader-friendly. 

    Waterbucket eNews has some 2000 subscribers. The anecdotal evidence suggests that there is also a multiplier effect through forwarding to others. Hence, the Partnership strives to find an editorial balance. Clearly, our first priority is to feature the work of the Partnership and our members. Yet it is also a priority to publish stories about others whose good work merits recognition. We welcome and appreciate hearing from you, the readership.

    In the coming months, you will hear and learn about the “twin pillars” of the whole-system, water balance approach to Sustainable Watershed Systems in British Columbia

    A Message from the Editor (Kim Stephens)

    Last October 30, my right arm broke under mysterious circumstances – it snapped as I carried a package of toilet paper. My life changed forever. And so began my battle with cancer which continues to this day. For the longest time, the medical staff at the local hospital were baffled. In early January, they elevated my case to the specialist team at the BC Cancer Agency. At that point, the power of Canada’s medical system really kicked in.

    My Year-Long Battle with Cancer: 

    Within a week of my first consultation with one of the world’s leading sarcoma surgeons, the pathology results established that I had the “rarest of the rare” cancer. In fact, there have only been 15 previously documented cases in the world of this form of cancer. A mere 18 days after the first consultation at the BC Cancer Agency, I underwent emergency surgery. It was a race against time.

    A team of three surgeons started on Friday evening and worked for 6 ½ hours into the early morning hours of Saturday to perform a life-saving operation to remove intact a 22-cm long tumour that had dissolved the bone in my upper arm. Then they reconstructed my arm with a donor humerus and an artificial elbow. Dr. Paul Clarkson made it clear that, in saving my arm, the objective was actually to save the use of my hand so that I would still have the ability to type. The arm itself is a dead weight because the surgeons removed my bicep and deltoid muscles.

    Importance of Staying Motivated: 

    Throughout my battle with cancer, my work with the Partnership has provided me with the motivation to adapt to my changed circumstances and stay focussed on delivering the Sustainable Watershed Systems program. Less than 2 ½ months after the February 2nd surgery, I commenced my comeback by delivering the keynote address on April 12 at the 2018 Nanaimo Water Stewardship Symposium. Slowly I have been ramping up.

    Then, in June, a CT scan determined that rogue cells had escaped during surgery via a compromised blood vessel. Not to worry, my sarcoma oncologist was ready with a plan. I am lucky because the timing for launch of a new drug for sarcoma treatment is NOW. This is the first breakthrough in 40 years, and I am in the first group to be part of the program.

    All is good as I am now halfway through chemo (4 of 8 cycles) and wonder drug combo. Next week, I am scheduled for another CT scan to assess the treatment progress. As I told Dr. Christine Simmons last week, I am feeling as strong as I have all year. Also, that the cancer is an inconvenience. I really don’t have time for it. I have a schedule to meet. So, please, read on!

    Introducing Sustainable Watershed Systems and the Asset Management Continuum

    Illustrated below, the twin pillars of Sustainable Watershed Systems are the Water Balance Methodology (adopted by the Province of British Columbia in 2002) and the Ecological Accounting Process(EAP), which is under development.

    In 2017-2018, federal-provincial funding enabled the Partnership to move forward with three initiatives:
    • Water Balance Model Desktop – downloadable version for advanced users complements the original online decision support tool.
    • Water Balance Express for Landowners – eight local government applications are now operational on Vancouver Island, Metro Vancouver, Sunshine Coast and Cape Breton.
    • EAP – two demonstration applications completed on Vancouver Island have tested the “valuation of worth” methodology to generate ‘real numbers’ using the BC Assessment database.

    The Partnership is currently collaborating with Union of BC Municipalities and the BC Ministry of Municipal Affairs & Housing to integrate ‘natural assets’ into engineered asset management. ‘Getting it right’ starts with recognition that hydrology is the engine that powers ecological services.

    Looking ahead, in the coming months we will publish a series of e-Newsletters that will elaborate on the “twin pillars” and the 3-stage implementation program for the Ecological Accounting Process.

  2. Professional Reliance Model in British Columbia (June 2018): Review recommends restructuring the governance of the professional associations by creating new legislation and an independent Office of Professional Regulation and Oversight

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    BC Government receives professional reliance final report

    The Province of British Columbia has received the final report on the independent professional reliance review, commissioned by government last fall.

    The professional reliance review was led by Mark Haddock, seconded from the British Columbia Forest Practices Board to author the report. The review included a public engagement, which received over 2,200 feedback forms from the public, 102 stakeholder submissions and over 1,800 surveys from qualified professionals.

    Recommendations

    The report provides recommendations on two aspects to improve the current professional reliance model.

    • First, the governance of the professional associations that oversee qualified professionals (QPs), including forest professionals, engineers and geoscientists, agrologists, biologists and technicians.
    • Second, consideration of improvements to 28 regulatory regimes that pertain to natural resource management.

    The report recommends restructuring the governance of the professional associations by creating new legislation and an independent office, which will bring together the five statutes governing the associations.

    Quotable Quotes

    “I thank Mark Haddock, the independent reviewer who developed this very comprehensive report,” said George Heyman, Minister of Environment and Climate Change Strategy. ”We will immediately engage with the various professional associations covered in the report, with a goal of making tangible changes this fall to improve government oversight of qualified professionals to enhance public confidence in natural resource decision making.”

    Reviewing the professional reliance model is an important component of the Confidence and Supply Agreement with the B.C. Green Party caucus.

    “In recent years, professional reliance has played a significant role in the loss of public trust in decision making around industrial activity,” said Sonia Furstenau, MLA for Cowichan Valley. “It is incumbent on the B.C. government to take urgent steps, as outlined in this report, to begin to rebuild that trust.”

    Next Steps

    The report also deals with a review of various regulations that fall under nine government statutes. Over the next several months, ministries that oversee these statutes will review the recommendations in detail, and continue consultation with Indigenous peoples, the business community, environmental groups and other public stakeholders.

    Consideration of the recommendations will take into account the clarity of expectation required by scientists and professionals who make decisions in the public interest.

    To Learn More:

    Download a a copy of the Professional Reliance Review.

    Report reaffirms Ombudsperson’s recommendations

    “These recommendations very clearly align with ones we have made in the past,” said Ombudsperson Jay Chalke. “I am hopeful government will make critical changes that my office and others have been continuing to recommend.”

    The Ombudsperson’s 2014 report Striking a Balance examined the challenges of the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Operations using a professional reliance model in environmental protection, specifically how professionals have been used in relation to British Columbia’s regulation of riparian areas. The report found there were significant gaps in the oversight framework relating to the work done by these professionals.

    “There is no question that there is still significant work ahead to ensure that all British Columbians have trust in environmental decision-making more generally,” said Chalke. “The additional light that this report sheds today is another important step in that direction.”

     

  3. OP-ED ARTICLE: B.C. needs to restore ‘adequate public oversight’ to protect the environment, says forester Anthony Britneff

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    NASA aerial photo of the Mount Polley Mine site in July 2014 before the dam breach

    Mine Disaster a Toxic Warning for BC Government

    “When a dam holding back a massive amount of highly toxic water gave way at the Mount Polley mine in August 2014, it triggered more than one of the worst environmental disasters in Canadian history,” wrote Anthony Britneff in an opinion piece published in the Vancouver Sun newspaper in June 2018.

    “It exposed the dark underside of the B.C. government’s policy of drumming large numbers of public servants out of the business of protecting our environment and turning much of that work over, instead, to the private sector.”

    To Learn More:

    To read the complete article, download a copy of B.C. needs to restore ‘adequate public oversight’ to protect the environment.

    Read more by Anthony Britneff at https://twitter.com/AnthonyBritneff

    Download a copy of the Professional Reliance Review completed by the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy .

    NASA aerial photo of the Mount Polley Mine site in August 2014 after the dam breach

     

  4. OP-ED ARTICLE: Celebrating a Decade of Living Water Smart in B.C. – Where To From Here?(Asset Management BC Newsletter, June 2018)

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    Note to Reader:

    The article that follows was published as an op-ed in the June 2, 2018 issue of the Vancouver Sun newspaper. A decade ago, the Living Water Smart program called British Columbians to action to create greener communities and prepare for climate change. The article celebrates the 10th anniversary and highlights that Asset Management for Sustainable Service Delivery: A BC Framework. is a game-changer flowing from Living Water Smart. 

    Collaboration in Local Government Setting

    “Water defines British Columbia, and the rhythms of water are changing – winters are wetter and warmer; summers are longer and drier. Flood, drought, fire, wind and cold – extreme events are the New Normal,” wrote Kim Stephens, Executive Director, the Partnership for Water Sustainability in BC.

    “The hard work of hope has resulted in a policy, program and regulatory framework that enables community-based action to adapt to the New Normal. Living Water Smart successes are defined by collaboration and a “top-down / bottom-up” approach. This brings together decision-makers and community advocates.

    “Sustainable service delivery by local government occurs alongside associated evolution in community thinking. By managing the built and natural environments as integrated systems, local governments would incrementally move towards a water-resilient future as an outcome.”

    TO LEARN MORE:

    To read the complete article, download the Summer 2018 issue of the Asset Management BC Newsletter.

     

  5. DOWNLOAD: “The Story of the 2008 Vancouver Island Learning Lunch Seminar Series” – this capacity-building program was a “grass-roots” demonstration application of how to build inter-departmental and inter-governmental alignment to achieve the vision for Living Water Smart, BC’s Water Plan

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    Note to Reader:

    Download a copy of the The Story of the 2008 Vancouver Island Learning Lunch Seminar Series

    Desired Outcome: All Land and Water Managers will Know What Makes a Stream Healthy

    Released in June 2008, “Living Water Smart, British Columbia’s Water Plan” was the Province’s call to action create greener communities and prepare for climate change. To this day, Living Water Smart transcends governments. The ripple effects resulting from transformational initiatives inspired by Living Water Smart are reverberating through time.

    Look back to look forward. What have we learned? How do we pass that understanding (of what we have learned over the past 10 years) onto successive generations of land use, infrastructure and asset management professionals who do their work in the local government setting? How can we help them make informed choices that benefit from past experience?

    A decade later, these are just some of the questions that guide the work of the Partnership for Water Sustainability in British Columbia.

    Living Water Smart, British Columbia’s Water Plan

    “While legislative reform is a foundation piece, collaboration takes place outside the legislative framework,” Lynn Kriwoken stated in 2008. An Executive Director in the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change, she personifies continuity, commitment and leadership in bringing the Living Water Smart vision to fruition.

    “This is why we constantly emphasize that Living Water Smart is about motivating and inspiring everyone to embrace shared responsibility. Influencing behaviour and attitudes is at the heart of moving from awareness to action,” added Kriwoken.

    The New Business As Usual

    Looking back, launch of the Living Water Smart outreach program commenced with a precedent-setting approach to capacity-building in the local government sector.

    Known as the 2008 Vancouver Island Learning Lunch Seminar Series, and delivered through the CAVI-Convening for Action on Vancouver Island initiative, this capacity-building program was a “grass-roots” demonstration application of how to build inter-departmental and inter-governmental alignment.

    “We are using the slogan The New Business As Usual to convey the message that, for change to really occur, practices that until now have been viewed as the exception must become the norm moving forward. We have to build regulatory models and develop models of practice and expertise to support The New Business As Usual,” stated Dale Wall,  former Deputy Minister in the Ministry of Community Development when he announced the Vancouver Island Learning Lunch Seminar Series at the Gaining Ground Summit.

    Demonstration Applications

    Both the Cowichan Valley Regional District and City of Courtenay stepped up to the plate and volunteered to host a regional seminar series.

    “Each session in the Cowichan Valley Learning Lunch Seminar Series started at 11:00am and ended at 2:30pm,” stated Peter Nilsen, former Deputy Engineer with the District of North Cowichan. “This was the right length of time to maintain the interest and energy level of participants. Three and a half hours sounds like a lot of time, but it goes quickly; and we were just scratching the surface in terms of the material that we presented.” Inter-departmental participation by all member local governments effectively meant closing front counters on three Fridays for most of the day so that planning, engineering, operations and building inspection staff could attend the Learning Lunch seminars.

    “Throughout the series, our theme and our challenge was to ask participants what will they do better or differently to achieve a shared vision for the Cowichan Valley,” stated David Hewetson, Building Inspector with the City of Duncan. “This is why it was so important to get everyone thinking in terms of the What – So What – Now What mind-map.”

    The Comox Valley series benefited from the insights that were gained from the successful Busy Place Creek walkabout, which was the finale for the Cowichan Valley series.

    “Walkabouts facilitate conversations and on-the-ground learning. This approach proved especially successful when we hosted the Showcasing Innovation series,” stated Kevin Lagan, former Director of Operational Services with the City of Courtenay. “We decided to feature the east Courtenay area in Seminar #1 because this part of the city has evolved from fields and forest over the past two decades, and so has our approach to rainwater / stormwater management. “Placing the spotlight on the east Courtenay area helped seminar participants understand why drainage practices comprise a continuum of paradigms.

    A decade later we celebrate Cowichan Valey and Comox Valley leadership as early adopters; and we reflect on what their efforts set in motion, and what comes next in the capacity-building process.

    To Learn More:

    Read LOOK BACK TO LOOK FORWARD: Experience and relationships flowing from the precedent-setting 2008 Vancouver Island Learning Lunch Seminar Series ultimately led to the Georgia Basin Inter-Regional Education Initiative (IREI), recalls John Finnie, CAVI Chair during the period 2006 through 2011

    Visit the homepage for the 2008 Cowichan Valley Learning Lunch Seminar Series.

    Visit the homepage for the 2008 Comox Valley Learning Lunch Seminar Series.

    Visit the homepage for the 2008 Cowichan Valley Water Balance Forum.

    Breakout groups at Cowichan Valley Learning Lunch Seminar #1 – June 2008

     

     

  6. OP-ED ARTICLE: Kim Stephens – Celebrating a decade of living water smart in B.C., but where to from here? (published in the Vancouver Sun in June 2018)

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    Note to Reader:

    On Saturday, June 2nd 2018, the Vancouver Sun newspaper published an op-ed article co-authored by four members of the Partnership for Water Sustainability’s leadership team, namely: Kim Stephens, Ted van der Gulik, Tim Pringle and Peter Law. The article is reproduced below.

    In 2008, the Living Water Smart program called British Columbians to action to create greener communities and prepare for climate change 

    Water defines British Columbia, and the rhythms of water are changing – winters are wetter and warmer; summers are longer and drier. Flood, drought, fire, wind and cold – extreme events are the New Normal. We are at a tipping point. When will communities adapt, and how?

    In 2008, “Living Water Smart, British Columbia’s Water Plan” was the Province’s call to action, and to this day transcends governments. The vision:

    “We take care of our water, our water takes care of us.”

    “On the 10th anniversary of its release, we celebrate transformational initiatives set in motion by Living Water Smart,” wrote the four co-authors.

    Collaboration in the Local Government Setting

    The hard work of hope has resulted in a policy, program and regulatory framework that enables community-based action to adapt to the New Normal. Living Water Smart successes are defined by collaboration and a “top-down / bottom-up” approach. This brings together decision-makers and community advocates.

    “While legislative reform is a foundation piece, collaboration takes place outside the legislative framework,” Lynn Kriwoken stated in 2008. An Executive Director in the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change, she personifies continuity, commitment and leadership in bringing the Living Water Smart vision to fruition.

    “This is why we constantly emphasize that Living Water Smart is about motivating and inspiring everyone to embrace shared responsibility. Influencing behaviour and attitudes is at the heart of moving from awareness to action,” added Kriwoken.

    Game-Changers Flowing from ‘Living Water Smart’

    The legislative piece is the Water Sustainability Act, one of several game-changers. A historic achievement, the Act recognizes the connections between land and water – what happens on the land matters!

    What Makes a Stream Healthy:

    In Living Water Smart, the lynch-pin statement is:

    “All land and water managers will know what makes a stream healthy, and therefore be able to help land and water users factor in new approaches to securing stream health and the full range of stream benefits”.

    This vision statement guides the work of the Partnership for Water Sustainability, the hub for a “convening for action” network in the local government setting. The Partnership collaborates with the province, local governments, stewardship sector and First Nations to develop and mainstream approaches, tools and resources that advance “design with nature” outcomes.

    Strategic Direction for Local Government:

    Another game-changer flowing from Living Water Smart is “Asset Management for Sustainable Service Delivery: A BC Framework”. Led by Asset Management BC, the BC Framework sets a strategic direction for local government service delivery. It refocuses business processes on how physical and natural assets are used to deliver services, and support outcomes that reduce life-cycle costs and address risks.

    Sustainable service delivery by local government occurs alongside associated evolution in community thinking. By managing the built and natural environments as integrated systems, local governments would incrementally move towards a water-resilient future as an outcome.

    Value of Ecological Services:

    Hydrology is the engine that powers ecological services. Thus, integration of the Partnership’s work within the BC Framework should accelerate implementation of the whole-system, water balance approach at the heart of the Partnership’s “Sustainable Watershed Systems, through Asset Management” program.

    A pillar of Sustainable Watershed Systems is the Ecological Accounting Process. EAP establishes what the definable benefits of ecological services derived from creekshed hydrology are, what they may be worth to stakeholders, and how they may be maintained and enhanced. EAP has the potential to transform how communities make decisions about creekshed restoration.

    Water & Food Security:

    Yet another game-changer flowing from Living Water Smart is the B.C. Agricultural Water Demand Model. It accounts for climate change, is applied to establish future needs for Agricultural Water Reserves, and is the engine for the online B.C. Agriculture Water Licence Calculator. Developed to support implementation of the B.C. Groundwater Regulation, the Calculator quantifies outdoor water use for any property in B.C., including residential.

    Call to Action

    B.C. communities can adapt to the New Normal. They can create a water-resilient future where flood and drought risks are reduced. As a result of initiatives inspired by Living Water Smart, we have tools and experience to “get it right”. So, through collaboration and commitment, together let’s make it happen – sooner, not later!

     

  7. DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCE: Assessing the Worth of Ecological Services Using the Ecological Accounting Process for Watershed Assessment – Demonstration Applications on Vancouver Island (April 2018)

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    Note to Reader:

    Funded by the governments of Canada and BC, the capacity-building program branded as Sustainable Watershed Systems, through Asset Management is designed to inform and educate local governments and stakeholders about the whole-system, water balance approach.

    The program includes the Ecological Accounting Process (EAP) to value the ‘water balance services’ provided by nature. Demonstration applications for small watersheds in the Cowichan and Comox valleys have been undertaken to show how local governments would apply this unique approach.

    EAP and the Water Balance Methodology are Interconnected

    The Nanaimo Water Stewardship Symposium on April 11-12, 2018 was designed to foster a conversation in the mid-Vancouver Island region and beyond about the transformational scope of the “Sustainable Watershed Systems, through Asset Management” program.

    “A vision for restorative development that revitalizes watershed function and health provided a philosophical backdrop for the Nanaimo Water Stewardship Symposium, co-hosted by the Partnership for Water Sustainability in British Columbia and the Nanaimo and Area Land Trust (NALT),” stated Kim Stephens, Partnership Executive Director.

    Restorative Development

    “The term ‘restorative development’ was coined by the writer Storm Cunningham in his first book The Restoration Economy, published in 2002,” contined Kim Stephens. It was the first book to document the new disciplines and fast-growing industries that are renewing our natural, built, and socioeconomic environments.

    “The Symposium provided a platform for a call for action because adapting to climate change requires transformation in how we value nature and service land. An informed stewardship sector can be a catalyst for action on Vancouver Island and beyond, through collaboration with local government.

    “Tim Pringle shared demonstration application anecdotes about the Ecological Accounting Process (EAP), a whole-system view of watersheds that assesses hydrology in order to accurately describe ecological services.”

    Why EAP is Useful

    “The focus of EAP is on watershed hydrological conditions and the dependent ecological services provided, and which sustain natural systems and human settlement.  EAP is not about engineering practices as the analytical starting point. Neither is it about managing hydrology through a land use, transportation, or other human settlement framework (or lens),” explained Tim Pringle, Chair, EAP Initiative.

    “The goal of EAP is to establish what the definable benefits of ecological services derived from watershed hydrology are, what they may be worth to stakeholders, and how they may be maintained and enhanced to function in near optimal condition.  This goal is completely compatible with official plans.

    “Suffice to say, we have taken the concept of Sustainable Watershed Systems; through Asset Management, and we have made it real. We have applied the Water Balance Methodology because it provides an accurate analysis of the condition of the hydrology. And in so doing, we have connected the dots. A defining statement is that the worth of a creekshed is a package of ecological services made possible by the hydrology.

    “The Cowichan and Comox demonstration applications allow us to be unequivocal in stating that ‘hydrology is the engine that powers ecological services’,” concluded Tim Pringle.

    To Learn More:

    To download a copy of the booklet that was released at the Nanaimo Water Stewardship Symposium in April 2018, click on Assessing the Worth of Ecological Services Using the Ecological Accounting Process (EAP) for Watershed Assessment

    For information about the program design for the Nanaimo Water Symposium, visit the homepage at: http://waterbucket.ca/viw/category/convening-for-action-in-2018/nanaimo-water-symposium/

     

  8. GUIDANCE DOCUMENT: “Stormwater Planning: A Guidebook for British Columbia” (released by the Province in 2002)

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    Note to Reader:

    In 2002, the provincial government released Stormwater Planning: A Guidebook for British ColumbiaThis established a new direction for urban hydrology and drainage engineering. Introduction of the Water Balance Methodology enabled the setting of performance targets for rainfall capture, runoff control and groundwater recharge:

    If we manage the runoff volume, and if we mimic the natural flow pattern in streams, then we can… prevent increased stream erosion, prevent increased risk of flooding, and protect aquatic habitat.

    The Guidebook introduced the Integrated Strategy for managing the complete spectrum of rainfall events (see image below). The Integrated Strategy expanded the scope and responsibility of drainage practice to include stream health.

    Integrated Strategy for Managing the Rainfall Spectrum & Mimicking the Water Balance

    Mimic the Water Balance

    “Released in 2002, the Guidebook provides a framework for effective rainwater management throughout the province. This tool for local governments presents a methodology for moving from planning to action that focuses on implementing early action where it is most needed,” stated Laura Maclean, Co-Chair of the Guidebook Steering Committee and Environment Canada representative.

    “The Guidebook approach is designed to eliminate the root cause of negative ecological and property impacts of rainwater runoff by addressing the complete spectrum of rainfall events.”

    “The Guidebook approach contrasts with conventional ‘flows-and-pipes’ stormwater management that focuses only on the fast conveyance of the extreme storms and often creates substantial erosion and downstream flooding in receiving streams.”

    “Solutions described in the Guidebook include conventional, detention, infiltration and re-use approaches for rainfall capture, runoff control and flood risk management.

    To download the Guidebook, click on links below:

    Stormwater Planning: A Guidebook for British Columbia (Complete Guidebook) (PDF/9.9 MB)

     

  9. GUIDANCE DOCUMENT: City of Chilliwack Policy and Design Criteria Manual for Surface Water Management (released 2002)

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    Note to Reader:

    The City of Chilliwack’s Policy and Design Criteria Manual for Surface Water Management, released in 2002, serves two purposes:

    • provide a comprehensive framework that will guide the development of individual Master Drainage Plans over a multi-year period
    • provide land developers with specific direction in undertaking the stormwater component of sustainable urban design.

    The driver for the Manual was large-scale land development planned for the City’s Eastern Hillsides. The Manual content has been, and continues to be, tested and refined on the basis of Chilliwack-specific case study applications.

    Surface Water Management in Chilliwack

    The City of Chillwack’s Manual was developed through an inter-departmental and inter-agency process that also included community participation.

    “Through this process, the group developed a common understanding regarding core concepts. This resulted in consensus on the vision and the direction of the Manual, particularly with respect to the framework that the Manual provides for future rainwater-related action in the City of Chilliwack. The Manual replaced the drainage section of the Subdivision and Development Control Bylaw,” stated Dipak Basu, Land Development Engineer, in 2002.

    “The process went on for two years. The realtors, developers, engineers and surveyors were all invited to participate and make their comments known.

    “We showed the benefits of maintaining the water table, the watercourse, the habitat and allowing the fish to survive and flourish. By the time the document was finalized, the developers were quite knowledgeable about it and were willing to give it a try to see how the system worked.

    “The Front End of the Manual summarizes key information that City staff, elected officials and land developers need in order to understand and implement the City of Chilliwack’s approach to stormwater management.”

    To Learn More:

    Download Policy and Design Criteria Manual for Surface Water Management

    Dipak Basu sets the context at the Chilliwack Water Balance Forum in Feb 2004

    Provincial Significance

    “The Manual was developed as a case study application of Stormwater Planning: A Guidebook for British Columbia, a collaborative effort of an inter-governmental partnership that was initiated by local government,” added Kim Stephens, project manager and principal author of the Guidebook. He was also project manager for the Chilliwack Manual. Today, he is the Executive Director, Partnership for Water Sustainability in BC.

    “Through interaction with the Chilliwack community during its development, the Manual also provided a feedback loop for the Guidebook process. The Manual incorporated the content of the Bylaw that it replaced, and is designed to manage both flood risk and environmental risk,” emphasized Dipak Basu.

    Stormwater Planning: A Guidebook for British Columbia

    In 2002, the provincial government released Stormwater Planning: A Guidebook for British Columbia. This established a new direction for urban hydrology and drainage engineering. Introduction of the Water Balance Methodology enabled the setting of performance targets for rainfall capture, runoff control and groundwater recharge:

    If we manage the runoff volume, and if we mimic the natural flow pattern in streams, then we can… prevent increased stream erosion, prevent increased risk of flooding, and protect aquatic habitat.

    The Guidebook introduced the Integrated Strategy for managing the complete spectrum of rainfall events (see image below). The Integrated Strategy expanded the scope and responsibility of drainage practice to include stream health.

    TO LEARN MORE:

    To read an article written by Geoff Gilliard in Spring 2003, and published in Input Magazine by the Real Estate Institute of BC, download A recipe for stormwater management – The Stormwater Planning Guidebook helps make land develolpment compatible with stream protection

     

     

  10. ARTICLE: “A recipe for stormwater management – The Stormwater Planning Guidebook helps make land develolpment compatible with stream protection” (published in Input Magazine, Spring 2003)

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    Note to Reader:

    In 2002, the provincial government released Stormwater Planning: A Guidebook for British Columbia. This established a new direction for urban hydrology and drainage engineering. Introduction of the Water Balance Methodology enabled the setting of performance targets for rainfall capture, runoff control and groundwater recharge:

    If we manage the runoff volume, and if we mimic the natural flow pattern in streams, then we can… prevent increased stream erosion, prevent increased risk of flooding, and protect aquatic habitat.

    The Guidebook introduced the Integrated Strategy for managing the complete spectrum of rainfall events (see image below). The Integrated Strategy expanded the scope and responsibility of drainage practice to include stream health.

    Eliminate the Root Cause of Impacts

    “For most of the last century, land development in our communities has followed the same general pattern: clear the trees, put in roads and subdivisions, and direct the runoff into the nearest stream or storm sewer. But pipes carrying runoff speed the flow of stormwater, often creating erosion and downstream flooding, wrote Geoff Gilliard in an article published in Spring 2003.

    “Many local governments are under pressure to protect streamside property that is threatened by stormwater development. The new Stormwater Planning Guidebook for BC gives municipal land planners and engineers a tool to help make land development compatible with stream protection.”

    “The Guidebook offers a new approach to stormwater management that eliminates the root cause of ecological and property impacts by designing for the complete spectrum of rainfall events.”

    “The Stormwater Planning Guidebook uses a series of case studies to illustrate solutions to stormater problems.”

    To Learn More:

    To read the complete article written by Geoff Gilliard in Spring 2003, and published in Input Magazine by the Real Estate Institute of BC, download A recipe for stormwater management – The Stormwater Planning Guidebook helps make land develolpment compatible with stream protection