DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCE: story of workshop on “Stormwater Impacts Communities and Creeks-What Can Streamkeepers Do?” (March 2017)

“Our objective in hosting the workshop was to raise awareness about ways to better manage rainwater runoff, maintain stream health and support watershed-based plans. The workshop introduced community members to a vision for Sustainable Watershed Systems and what it means to value watersheds as infrastructure elements," stated Barbara Frisken. “Breakout groups then identified possible community actions that can support a sustained focus on improving watersheds.”

BOOK LAUNCH: “The book ‘downstream: reimagining water’ is an anthology and my chapter is titled Interweaving Weaver,” states Michael Blackstock, independent scholar and author

“Blue Ecology is an ecological philosophy, which emerged from interweaving First Nations and Western thought. It is just a starting point in this new era of interweaving,” states Michael Blackstock. “Our children’s children will be faced with daunting, complex, and urgent environmental problems. The impending crisis requires us to begin to lay a foundation for our children’s children to have a starting point, and some options to grasp in the urgent moment. We owe them hope.”

FLASHBACK TO 2005: “Implementing change is primarily a people matter, not a technical one,” wrote Erik Karlsen in a paper that introduced the What / So What / Now What / Then What mind-map as a foundation piece for convening for action

“Bridging the gap between interest and practice involves motivating practitioners to engage in ways that provide sufficient meaning to inspire them and lead to action. The desired outcome is implementation of on-the-ground changes in policies, programs, applied research, practitioner education and standards of practice that lead to full integration of land development and water management," stated Erik Karlsen.

FLASHBACK TO 2011: Nature in BC’s Lower Mainland offers $5.4 billion annually in economic benefits, concludes report by Suzuki Foundation


"As biological creatures, we depend on natural capital and its ecosystem services to sustain the health and well-being of our families and communities. But these benefits are often taken for granted by decision-makers on land-use issues, such as municipal zoning, because we have such a poor understanding of what they are and what they’re truly worth," stated Dr. Faisal Moola, Science Director of the Suzuki Foundation.

FLASHBACK TO 2012: Still Creek – rebirth of an urban stream in Metro Vancouver (video)

Still Creek is a highly urbanized watershed with a population of over 100,000 residents, and drains from the City of Vancouver into the City of Burnaby. “To see salmon return to Still Creek after so many decades has been incredibly exciting, especially given that just a few decades ago, this stream was widely viewed as one of Canada’s most polluted waterways. Quite simply, the events that have unfolded on Still Creek highlight the fact that we should never give up on any river," states Mark Angelo.

ARTICLE: Planet Reconciliation – Interweaving Indigenous knowledge and western science to make water-first decisions through Blue Ecology (published in Water Canada magazine, March-April 2017)

"The journey to a water-resilient future starts with Western science acknowledging water for its central functional and spiritual roles in our world," states Michael Blackstock. "Blue Ecology has five guiding principles and aligns with the whole-system, water balance approach. Adoption of the principles – Spirit, Harmony, Respect, Unity and Balance - would move Blue Ecology from theory to practice, as an aid for water managers."

PUBLIC WORKSHOP: Stormwater Impacts Communities and Creeks – What Can Streamkeepers Do? (March 18 in North Vancouver)

“The ultimate objective of the workshop is to support fish populations – good habitat is a key element and sustainable watersheds are part of the big picture,” states Glen Parker. "Public awareness and support is essential to achieving this objective. So we need to draw community attention to the tangible things that all residents can do to support sustainable watersheds. Their cumulative beneficial actions will lead to good habitat and fish will thrive.”

DOWNLOAD: Comox Valley Eco-Asset Management Symposium – Discovering Nature’s Infrastructure Potential (Feb 2017)

The Symposium will introduce participants to Sustainable Watershed Systems, through Asset Management. “The purpose of the Symposium is to build local knowledge and interest in how to apply eco-asset management principles at the local level,” states Tim Ennis, Executive Director, Comox Valley Land Trust. “The Symposium is very much about setting in motion a mind-set change. It is therefore essential that everyone steps back and sees the big picture.”

ARTICLE: Ecological Accounting Protocol – A Tool to Calculate the Opportunity Cost of Drainage Infrastructure (Asset Management BC Newsletter, Winter 2017)

"Over the past year, we have improved the logic of the Ecological Accounting Protocol. In a nutshell, it is about specific values (pricing) - not imputed, generalized values," wrote Tim Pringle. "Since cost-avoidance, at least perceived cost-avoidance, motivates much of the decision-making process about infrastructure, and development in general, why has the obvious role of natural assets been omitted to date? The Ecological Accounting Protocol suggests it is the lack of measurement."