Archive:

2017

2017 Report from the Executive Director: “New Societies Act provides the Partnership with clarity regarding our identity as a government-funded entity,” stated Kim Stephens


“Now that the Societies Act has provided the Partnership with clarity regarding our identify, it allows the Board of Directors to focus on the Partnership mission – which is to serve as the hub for a ‘convening for action’ network in the local government setting, and to deliver the Water Sustainability Action Plan for British Columbia through partnerships and collaboration,” wrote Kim Stephens. “The Partnership is funded exclusively by government and provides services to government.”

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DID YOU KNOW THAT: waterbucket.ca is home for the Water Sustainability Action Plan for British Columbia


“Knowing the Waterbucket user-base was wanting to find information easily, we redesigned the home page with not only a more contemporary look and feel but also to facilitate it being a portal to all of the different content-rich sections of the site,” stated Susan Friesen. “”Now site users can enjoy a faster, easier and mobile-friendly experience to conduct their research and become more informed with the valuable resources the Partnership for Water Sustainability in BC provides.”

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Lifetime Member – Debra Oakman


The early and strong support of Debra Oakman for demonstrating the benefits of the ‘regional team approach’ in the Comox Valley was a key to the success of CAVI-Convening for Action on Vancouver Island. Her support helped to lay the foundation for successfully launching the Georgia Basin Inter-Regional Education Initiative in 2012. Comox Valley activities and successes have stimulated interest and action in the vision for “Sustainable Watershed Systems, through Asset Management”.

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Champion Supporter: recognition of the Township of Langley (October 2017)


Design with nature, a whole-system approach, learn by doing and adapt. These three phrases capture the essence of how the Township builds neighbourhoods. “There are many staff members that have made this happen,” stated Mayor Jack Froese. “Council makes policy and we approve policies. And then it is our wonderful staff that carry out the policies. And so, I certainly want to recognize the work that they have done.”

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BECOME AN ASSOCIATE MEMBER


“The Directors concluded that it would be in the best long-term interests of the Partnership to make membership simple to administrate. Any individual with an interest in green infrastructure and/or water sustainability can become an associate member of the Partnership. All that individuals need do is go to ‘waterbucket.ca’ and follow the instructions to receive the Partnership’s weekly e-Newsletters,” states Peter Law.

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What the Partnership Does


“The vision of the Partnership is that water sustainability will be achieved through implementation of green infrastructure policies and practices,” states Tim Pringle, Past-President. “Because the Partnership is the hub for a ‘convening for action’ network, we are positioned to facilitate alignment of regional and local actions with provincial goals. By providing education, research, technical training and tools, we can help communities move from awareness to action.”

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Lifetime Member – Mike Donnelly


“The Regional District of Nanaimo’s water sustainability goals have meshed very well with those of the Partnership over the many years we have worked together. The working relationship enhances the ability of both organizations to reach their common goals in water sustainability while supporting each other. A highlight of that relationship was being part of the Inter Regional Education Initiative, an excellent forum for learning and passing on hard won experience,” stated Mike Donnelly.

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A Testimonial to the Partnership for Water Sustainability: “Thanks for your tireless efforts to spread an understanding of hydrology and watershed-based land management!”, wrote Deborah Jones (Jan 2017)


Healthy forests are the backbone of watersheds. Forests of high biodiversity act like a sponge, which holds water on the land and allows clean filtered water into streams and rivers. This helps to ensure healthy fisheries. Unhealthy watersheds tend to have low biodiversity. Water is not retained on the land and erosion is increased. This results in unhealthy stream, river and fisheries and communities.

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